First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers

Loung Ung, Author, Ung, Author
Loung Ung, Author, Ung, Author HarperCollins Publishers $23.95 (256p) ISBN 978-0-06-019332-4
Reviewed on: 01/31/2000
Release date: 02/01/2000
Paperback - 238 pages - 978-0-06-085626-7
Prebound-Glued - 238 pages - 978-1-4177-3222-7
Paperback - 272 pages - 978-0-06-093138-4
Prebound-Glued - 238 pages - 978-0-7569-8482-3
Prebound-Other - 978-0-606-25162-4
Audio Product - 1 pages - 978-1-4526-2327-6
Open Ebook - 288 pages - 978-1-78057-752-4
Prebound-Sewn - 978-0-613-33896-7
Compact Disc - 978-1-4526-0327-8
Compact Disc - 978-1-4526-3327-5
MP3 CD - 978-1-4526-5327-3
Paperback - 236 pages - 978-1-84018-519-5
Ebook - 288 pages - 978-0-06-203654-4
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In 1975, Ung, now the national spokesperson for the Campaign for a Landmine-Free World, was the five-year-old child of a large, affluent family living in Phnom Penh, the cosmopolitan Cambodian capital. As extraordinarily well-educated Chinese-Cambodians, with the father a government agent, her family was in great danger when the Khmer Rouge took over the country and throughout Pol Pot's barbaric regime. Her parents' strength and her father's knowledge of Khmer Rouge ideology enabled the family to survive together for a while, posing as illiterate peasants, moving first between villages, and then from one work camp to another. The father was honest with the children, explaining dangers and how to avoid them, and this, along with clear sight, intelligence and the pragmatism of a young child, helped Ung to survive the war. Her restrained, unsentimental account of the four years she spent surviving the regime before escaping with a brother to Thailand and eventually the United States is astonishing--not just because of the tragedies, but also because of the immense love for her family that Ung holds onto, no matter how she is brutalized. She describes the physical devastation she is surrounded by but always returns to her memories and hopes for those she loves. Her joyful memories of life in Phnom Penh are close even as she is being trained as a child soldier, and as, one after another, both parents and two of her six siblings are murdered in the camps. Skillfully constructed, this account also stands as an eyewitness history of the period, because as a child Ung was so aware of her surroundings, and because as an adult writer she adds details to clarify the family's moves and separations. Twenty-five years after the rise of the Khmer Rouge, this powerful account is a triumph. 8 pages b&w photos. (Feb.)
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