THE TRISTAN BETRAYAL

Robert Ludlum, Author
Robert Ludlum, Author . St. Martin's $27.95 (528p) ISBN 978-0-312-31669-3
Compact Disc
Analog Audio Cassette - 978-1-55927-934-5
Analog Audio Cassette - 978-1-55927-936-9
Mass Market Paperbound - 519 pages
Hardcover - 752 pages - 978-0-7862-5628-0
Hardcover - 758 pages - 978-1-59413-053-3
Compact Disc - 978-1-4272-0566-7
Mass Market Paperbound - 580 pages - 978-0-312-37220-0
Ebook - 528 pages - 978-1-4299-0673-9
Paperback - 544 pages - 978-0-7528-5748-0
Paperback - 504 pages - 978-1-4091-1777-3
Show other formats
FORMATS

The author's death three years ago has not prevented St. Martin's from publishing recent material under his name. This WWII-era thriller opens in August 1991 as American ambassador Stephen Metcalfe arrives in Moscow, where Communist hard-liners are attempting to wrest control of Russia from the reform government. The fate of the country will be decided by an official known as the Dirizhor—the Conductor—and Metcalfe is the only man who can convince him to resist the forces of Stalinist darkness. Flash back to 1940, just after the Nazis have signed a nonaggression pact with the Russians. Young playboy/espionage agent Metcalfe is sent by American spymaster "Corky" Corcoran to the U.S.S.R. to enlist an old lover, Lana ("an extraordinary woman, impossibly beautiful, magnetic, passionate") in a scheme that if successful will change the course of history. Hot on Metcalfe's tail is assassin Kleist, a Nazi Secret Service agent who dispatches his enemies by garroting them with the E string of his violin. These principals and a host of others thrust and parry between Paris, Moscow and Berlin before a final confrontation in an enormous, mock factory fashioned of plywood and cleverly painted canvas. The factory, a bombing decoy, provides an apt metaphor for the book: a hollow, flimsy construct unable to hold the weight of a bloated plot and an army of clichéd characters. All of Ludlum's trademarks are in evidence: one-sentence paragraphs, a plentitude of exclamation points, ridiculous dialogue ("Die, you bastard!") and the breathless use of italics to impart excitement, but in the end there are few surprises in this unsatisfying behemoth. Perhaps it's time to let the master rest in peace. (Oct. 28)

Forecast: Ludlum's many fans may relish this gift from the grave, but others will find it thin fare, far from the author's best efforts. 750,000 first printing; major ad/promo campaign.

The Best Books, Emailed Every Week
Tip Sheet!
MORE BOOKS YOU'D LIKE
X