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A BOX OF MATCHES

Nicholson Baker, Author
Nicholson Baker, Author . Random $19.95 (192p) ISBN 978-0-375-50287-3
Reviewed on: 10/14/2002
Release date: 01/01/2003
Paperback - 178 pages - 978-0-375-70603-5
Ebook - 978-1-58836-312-1
Open Ebook - 978-1-4000-7633-8
Open Ebook - 1 pages - 978-1-299-21647-1
Paperback - 178 pages - 978-0-09-944838-9
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A starred or boxed review indicates a book of outstanding quality. A review with a blue-tinted title indicates a book of exceptional importance that hasn't received a starred or boxed review.

A BOX OF MATCHESNicholson Baker. Random, $19.95 (192p) ISBN 0-375-50287-4

The science of the insignificant has always been Baker's field of study. Treading a fine line between microcosmic dazzlement and banality, he has carved out a minuscule kingdom for himself. After his recent excursion into nonfiction (the National Book Critics Circle Award–winning Double Fold), he returns to fiction with a novel in the classic Baker tradition. For Emmett, a 44-year-old father and textbook editor, the predawn wintry darkness is an invitation to musings and meditations on life's events—make that nonevents. Each chapter begins virtually identically ("Good morning, it's 4:45 a.m...."), with Emmett reflecting on something as he sips coffee and warms himself by the fire: the family's pet duck, outside in the cold; a well-worn briefcase; an alternative career as a lichen expert; the idea of collecting paper towel designs. His family—two children and wife Claire—occasionally appear in his ruminations, and his love for them is palpable. But they never emerge as more than background figures, because Emmett's preoccupation is with himself; at one point, he (literally) gathers lint from his navel. Baker struggles to manufacture drama ("Last night my sleep was threatened by a toe-hole in my sock"), and his prose is evocative (a match bursting into flame becomes a "dandelion head of little sparks"). He is such an excellent writer, a master of descriptive detail with an unusual perspective on the world, that he can almost be forgiven for his tendency to focus on the mundane—almost. Emmett's life may seem rich to him, but it isn't rich enough to propel an entire novel. Even readers with a weakness for Baker's particular brand of minutiae may find themselves hoping that next time he will find a subject worthier of his prose. Agent, Melanie Jackson.Author tour.(Jan. 14)

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