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This Book Will Save Your Life

A. M. Homes, Author
A. M. Homes, Author . Viking $24.95 (372p) ISBN 978-0-670-03493-2
Reviewed on: 01/23/2006
Release date: 05/01/2006
Compact Disc - 978-0-7927-3941-8
Hardcover - 978-1-86207-969-4
Hardcover - 372 pages - 978-1-86207-848-2
Paperback - 372 pages - 978-1-86207-933-5
Audio Product - 978-1-4055-0279-5
Hardcover - 978-1-4074-1363-1
Open Ebook - 384 pages - 978-1-4406-7951-3
Compact Disc - 978-0-14-305850-2
Hardcover - 352 pages - 978-1-86207-899-4
Hardcover - 480 pages - 978-1-4074-0249-9
Hardcover - 11 pages - 978-1-4074-0513-1
Hardcover - 11 pages - 978-1-4074-0458-5
Hardcover - 1 pages - 978-1-4074-0514-8
Analog Audio Cassette - 978-0-7927-3940-1
Compact Disc - 978-0-14-314185-3
Paperback - 372 pages - 978-0-14-303874-0
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The journey from isolation to connection in a semiapocalyptic Los Angeles is the subject of this blithely redemptive new novel by Homes (Things You Should Know ). Richard Novak is a day-trader wealthy enough to employ a housecleaner, nutritionist, decorator and personal trainer, but after he's taken to the hospital with a panic attack he realizes he has no one to call. Determined to change his life, but also stalked by strange circumstances (e.g., a sinkhole opens in his lawn), Richard makes extravagant gestures of goodwill toward various acquaintances, relatives and strangers. By the time his misguided altruistic adventures have become fodder for late-night TV jokes, Ben, the son he abandoned years ago in a divorce, arrives in town. Richard's tenuous and fraught reconnection with Ben is at the heart of his reclamation, but when it is complete the city of L.A. itself collapses, à la Mike Davis's City of Quartz . Homes's stale cultural critique feels deliberate. She gradually undoes the ordered precision of Richard's Bobo paradise, and literally leaves him floating serenely on his kitchen tabletop in an "it's all good" sort of daze. But the cool distance she keeps from Richard's struggle, and the banal terms in which she articulates it, leave one with a much darker sense of the possibilities for being saved. (Apr.)

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