The Unlikely Spy

Daniel Silva, Author
Daniel Silva, Author Villard Books $25 (448p) ISBN 978-0-679-45562-2
Analog Audio Cassette - 978-0-553-47734-4
Hardcover - 847 pages - 978-0-7862-1101-2
Mass Market Paperbound - 978-0-449-00142-4
Mass Market Paperbound - 978-0-449-00265-0
Mass Market Paperbound - 978-0-8041-1744-9
Hardcover - 978-0-517-36153-5
Mass Market Paperbound - 544 pages - 978-0-449-00264-3
Mass Market Paperbound - 978-0-449-45938-6
Open Ebook - 752 pages - 978-1-4406-2787-3
Mass Market Paperbound - 752 pages - 978-0-451-20930-6
Hardcover - 559 pages - 978-0-7528-0909-0
Hardcover - 454 pages - 978-0-297-81790-1
Compact Disc - 978-1-4233-6832-8
MP3 CD - 978-1-4233-6834-2
Compact Disc - 978-1-4233-6836-6
Compact Disc - 978-1-4233-6833-5
Analog Audio Cassette - 978-1-4233-6831-1
MP3 CD - 978-1-4233-6835-9
Pre-Recorded Audio Player - 978-1-61545-540-9
Show other formats
FORMATS
Will Nazi spies escape from Britain with Allied plans for the imminent invasion of Normandy? As history tells us, obviously not--so the challenge for veteran journalist and CNN producer Silva in his first novel is to brew up enough intrigue and tension to make readers forget the obvious. While Silva employs multiple characters and settings, his key players are an English counterintelligence officer and a beautiful Nazi spy. Alfred Vicary is an academic recruited to work for MI5. The intelligence reports he fabricates and sends to Germany are designed to persuade the Nazis that their utterly compromised spy network, the Abwehr, is still fully operational. MI5 learns, however, that the Abwehr has been keeping a few sleeper operatives under deep cover throughout the war. Now they pose a serious threat to the invasion plans. One of these operatives is Catherine Blake, a ruthless assassin and spy. Her assignment is to become romantically involved with Peter Jordan, an American engineer working on a top-secret D-Day project. Will Vicary be able to stop her? Silva's characters are strong; but, despite occasional bursts of high suspense and a body count to remember, his overall pacing is uneven, and most readers won't forget that D-Day succeeded. The final plot twist, moreover, while unpredictable, seems more logical than shocking. Silva's debut will find an audience among devoted readers of WWII thrillers, and deservedly so, but he's not yet on a par with such masters of the genre as Ken Follett, Robert Harris and Jack Higgins. 150,000 first printing; $150,000 ad/promo; BOMC alternate selection; Reader's Digest Condensed Book selection; simultaneous BDD audio; foreign rights to 16 countries; author tour. (Jan.)
The Best Books, Emailed Every Week
Tip Sheet!
MORE BOOKS YOU'D LIKE
X