Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis, Thomas Jefferson, and the Opening of the American West

Stephen E. Ambrose, Author
Stephen E. Ambrose, Author Touchstone $30 (512p) ISBN 978-0-684-81107-9
Reviewed on: 02/12/1996
Release date: 02/01/1996
Paperback - 521 pages - 978-0-684-82697-4
Prebound-Other - 978-0-606-18621-6
Compact Disc - 978-0-7435-0784-4
Analog Audio Cassette - 978-0-7435-0783-7
Compact Disc - 978-0-7435-0808-7
Analog Audio Cassette - 978-0-671-57443-7
Compact Disc - 978-0-7435-7929-2
Prebound-Glued - 521 pages - 978-0-7807-7399-8
Prebound-Other - 521 pages - 978-0-613-02217-0
Downloadable Audio - 978-0-7435-5095-6
Downloadable Audio - 978-0-7435-1876-5
Hardcover - 592 pages - 978-0-7434-7788-8
Compact Disc - 978-1-4159-1809-8
Open Ebook - 528 pages - 978-1-4391-2617-2
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Ambrose has written prolifically about men who were larger than life: Dwight Eisenhower, Richard Nixon, Colonel Custer. Here he takes on half of the two-headed hero of American exploration: Meriwether Lewis. Ambrose, his wife and five children have followed the footsteps of the Lewis and Clark expedition for 20 summers, in the course of which the explorer has become a friend of the Ambrose family; the author's affection shines through this narrative. Meriwether Lewis, as secretary to Thomas Jefferson and living in the White House for two years, got his education by being apprenticed to a great man. Their friendship is at the center of this account. Jefferson hand-picked Lewis for the great cross-country trek, and Lewis in turn picked William Clark to accompany him. The two men shook hands in Clarksville, Ohio, on October 14, 1803, then launched their expedition. The journals of the expedition, most written by Clark, are one of the treasures of American history. Here we learn that the vital boat is behind schedule; the boat builder is always drunk, but he's the only one available. Lewis acts as surveyor, builder and temperance officer in his effort to get his boat into the river. Alcohol continues to cause him problems both with the men of his expedition and later, after his triumphant return, in his own life, which ended in suicide at the age of 35. Without adding a great deal to existing accounts, Ambrose uses his skill with detail and atmosphere to dust off an icon and put him back on the trail west. History Book Club main selection; BOMC split selection; QPB alternate; author tour. (Feb.)
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