A Prayer for Owen Meany

John Irving, Author
John Irving, Author William Morrow & Company $25 (543p) ISBN 978-0-688-07708-2
Reviewed on: 09/02/1991
Release date: 09/01/1991
Mass Market Paperbound - 640 pages - 978-0-345-36179-0
Paperback - 978-0-345-91556-6
Prebound-Other - 978-0-606-16249-4
Hardcover - 978-0-345-91555-9
Prebound-Sewn - 978-0-7807-9466-5
Compact Disc - 978-1-4805-3013-3
MP3 CD - 978-1-4805-3014-0
Hardcover - 672 pages - 978-0-679-64259-6
Prebound-Glued - 619 pages - 978-0-613-03421-0
Paperback - 636 pages - 978-0-552-99369-2
Ebook - 640 pages - 978-0-06-220410-3
Paperback - 627 pages - 978-0-06-220409-7
Mass Market Paperbound - 617 pages - 978-0-06-220422-6
Paperback - 1137 pages - 978-0-06-220557-5
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Irving's storytelling skills have gone seriously astray in this contrived, preachy, tedious tale of the eponymous Owen Meany, a latter-day prophet and Christ-like figure who dies a martyr after having inspired true Christian belief in the narrator, Johnny Wheelwright. The boys grow up close friends in a small New Hampshire town, where Owen's loutish parents own a quarry and where the fatherless Johnny, whose beloved mother never reveals the secret of his paternity, becomes an orphan at age 11 when a foul ball hit by Owen in a Little League game strikes his mother on the head, killing her instantly. The tragedy notwithstanding, Owen and Johnny cleave to a friendship sealed when Owen uses desperate means to keep Johnny from going to Vietnam, and brought to its apotheosis when Johnny is present at the death Owen has seen prefigured in a vision. Despite the overworked theme of a boy's best friend causing his mother's injury or death (one thinks immediately of Robertson Davies and Nancy Willard), the plot might have been workable had not Irving made Owen a caricature: Owen is, all his life, so tiny he can be lifted with one hand; he is ``mortally cute,'' and he has a ``cartoon voice'' because he must shout through his nose, which Irving conveys by printing all of Owen's dialogue in capital lettersan irritating device that immediately sets the reader's teeth on edge. Then too, the author's portentously dramatic foreshadowing, which has worked well in his previous books, is here sadly overdone and excessively melodramatic. On the plus side, Irving is convincing in his appraisal of the tragedy of Vietnam and in his religious philosophizing, in which he distinguishes the true elements of faith. But that is not enough to save the meandering narrative. Owen is not the only one to hit a foul ball in this novel, which is too ``mortally cute'' for its own good. BOMC main selection. (Mar)
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