A tinted review in adult Forecasts indicates a book that's of exceptional importance to our readers but hasn't received a starred or boxed review.

 

SWAN

Frances Mayes, Author
Frances Mayes, Author . Broadway $25 (336p) ISBN 978-0-7679-0285-4
Reviewed on: 07/22/2002
Release date: 10/01/2002
Peanut Press/Palm Reader - 320 pages - 978-0-7679-1393-5
Paperback - 336 pages - 978-0-7679-0286-1
Analog Audio Cassette - 978-0-553-71377-0
Hardcover - 523 pages - 978-0-7862-4853-7
Hardcover - 320 pages - 978-0-593-04503-9
Hardcover - 352 pages - 978-0-553-81251-0
Hardcover - 520 pages - 978-0-7540-1885-8
Show other formats
FORMATS

A tinted review in adult Forecasts indicates a book that's of exceptional importance to our readers but hasn't received a starred or boxed review.

SWANFrances Mayes. Broadway, $25 (336p) ISBN 0-7679-0285-8

Combining elements from her own life abroad and at home, Mayes presents her first novel, after a series of wildly popular Italian memoirs (Under the Tuscan Sun, etc.). The author, a Georgia native, has much working in her favor: she's built up a legion of loyal readers through her nonfiction, and this tale—which takes place in a Steel Magnolias-like sleepy Southern town—offers the tried and true matters of family saga, mystery and Americana. The Mason family has owned cotton mills and other valuable real estate in the town of Swan, Ga. for generations. J.J. and Ginger Mason lost their mother, Catherine, when they were children. Now they are in their early 30s, and Ginger is living—where else?—in Tuscany, working as an archeologist; J.J. is still in Swan, a sort of reclusive mountain man who spends his days sketching the arrowheads he finds on fishing trips. They're reunited when bad news surfaces: Catherine's body has mysteriously been dug up, 19 years after her death. Ginger flies home, and she and J.J., while at a loss as to whodunit, begin to unearth previously unknown details about their mother's life. With the steady—if not necessarily riveting—mystery serving as a base plot, Mayes weaves various side stories involving the unfortunate demise of Ginger and J.J.'s father and the fate of their grandfather's mistress, among others. Mayes's writing is smooth and her homespun evocations of the steamy South are moving. And although the story begins to lose its oomph after 200 or so pages, this is a pleasurable read that will please Mayes's devotees. Agent, Peter Ginsberg. (Oct. 8)

Forecast:The built-in audience, Mayes's name recognition and probable media play targeted at reading groups will surely ignite sales.

The Best Books, Emailed Every Week
Tip Sheet!
MORE BOOKS YOU'D LIKE
X