Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945

Tony Judt, Author
Tony Judt, Author . Penguin Press $39.95 (878p) ISBN 978-1-59420-065-6
Reviewed on: 08/29/2005
Release date: 10/01/2005
Paperback - 933 pages - 978-0-7126-6564-3
MP3 CD - 2 pages - 978-1-4417-7822-2
Compact Disc - 25 pages - 978-1-4417-7820-8
Compact Disc - 25 pages - 978-1-4417-7821-5
Open Ebook - 960 pages - 978-1-4362-8352-6
Pre-Recorded Audio Player - 978-1-4417-7825-3
Paperback - 933 pages - 978-0-14-303775-0
Open Ebook - 960 pages - 978-1-4406-2476-6
Open Ebook - 960 pages - 978-1-4464-1802-4
Open Ebook - 1 pages - 978-1-4417-7824-6
Show other formats
FORMATS

This is the best history we have of Europe in the postwar period and not likely to be surpassed for many years. Judt, director of New York University's Remarque Institute, is an academic historian of repute and, more recently, a keen observer of European affairs whose powerfully written articles have appeared in the New York Times , the New York Review of Books and elsewhere. Here he combines deep knowledge with a sharply honed style and an eye for the expressive detail.

Postwar is a hefty volume, and there are places where the details might overwhelm some readers. But the reward is always there: after pages on cabinet shuffles in some small country, or endless diplomatic negotiations concerning the fate of Germany or moves toward the European Union, the reader is snapped back to attention by insightful analysis and excellent writing. Judt shows that the dire human and economic costs of WWII shadowed Europe for a very long time afterward. Europeans and Americans recall the economic miracle, but it didn't really transform people's lives until the late 1950s, when a new, more individualized, consumer-oriented society began to appear in the West. But Postwar is not just a history of Western Europe. One of its great virtues is that it fully integrates the history of Eastern and Western Europe, and covers the small countries as well as the large and powerful ones.

Judt is judicious, even a bit uncritical, in his appraisal of American involvement in Europe in the early postwar years, and he's scathing about Western intellectuals' accommodation to communism. His book focuses on cultural and intellectual life rather than the social experiences of factory workers or peasants, but it would probably be impossible to encompass all of it in one volume. Overall, this is history writing at its very best. Agent, Andrew Wylie. (On sale Oct. 10)

The Best Books, Emailed Every Week
Tip Sheet!
MORE BOOKS YOU'D LIKE
X