Fire Season: Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout

Philip Connors, Author
Philip Connors, Ecco, $24.99 (256p) ISBN 978-0-06-185936-6
MP3 CD - 978-1-4417-8214-4
Paperback - 246 pages - 978-1-4472-0814-3
Hardcover - 368 pages - 978-1-4448-1209-1
Analog Audio Cassette - 978-1-4417-8211-3
Compact Disc - 978-1-4417-8212-0
Compact Disc - 978-1-4417-8213-7
Book - 1 pages - 978-1-4417-8216-8
Ebook - 272 pages - 978-0-06-207890-2
Pre-Recorded Audio Player - 978-1-4417-8217-5
Paperback - 246 pages - 978-0-06-185937-3
Hardcover - 288 pages - 978-0-230-75801-8
Show other formats
FORMATS
For almost a decade, former Wall Street Journal reporter Connors has spent half a year keeping vigil over 20,000 square miles of desert, forest, and mountain chains from atop a tower 10,000 feet above sea level. One of a handful of seasoned, seasonal fire-watchers in New Mexico's Gila National Forest, Connors introduces us to his wilderness in this ruminative, lyrical, occasionally suspenseful account that bristles with the narrative energy and descriptive precision of Annie Dillard and dovetails between elegiac introspection and a history of his curious and lonely occupation. Poet Gary Snyder, environmental advocate Edward Abbey, and beat novelist Jack Kerouac once stood watch over the woods, but today, 90% of American lookout towers have been decommissioned, with only a few hundred remaining. The world at large intrudes in Connors's account of contented isolation only in a discussion of evolving forest fire–fighting policies, in which advocates of ruthlessly suppressing fires are pitted against a new generation of Forest Service professionals who choose, when it's safe, to let forest fires burn themselves out. (Apr.)
The Best Books, Emailed Every Week
Tip Sheet!
MORE BOOKS YOU'D LIKE
X