SEEK MY FACE

John Updike, Author
John Updike, Author . Knopf $23 (288p) ISBN 978-0-375-41490-9
Hardcover - 318 pages - 978-1-58547-318-2
Paperback - 288 pages - 978-0-345-46086-8
Compact Disc - 978-0-553-75657-9
Open Ebook - 288 pages - 978-0-307-41659-9
Book - 1 pages - 978-1-4159-5200-9
Paperback - 288 pages - 978-0-14-101116-5
Hardcover - 288 pages - 978-0-14-101333-6
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Couched in the form of a day-long conversation between 79-year–old painter Hope Chafetz, living in seclusion in Vermont, and a chic young interviewer from New York, Updike's 20th novel is an ambitious attempt to capture the moment when America "for the first time ever... led world art." As a fictional survey of the birth of abstract expressionism, pop art and other contemporary genres, the narrative offers a somewhat slick overview of the roiling currents of genius and calculation, artistic vision and personal ambition that characterized the art scene in the postwar years. Updike's ability to get inside an artist's psyche is considerable, as Hope's monologue convincingly demonstrates. Because he tries to distill and convey an era of art history, however, there is a static and didactic quality to the narrative; much of it sounds like art-crit disguised as exposition. As a reader can infer from an author's note in which Updike acknowledges his debt to the Naifeh and Smith biography of Jackson Pollock, Hope's life bears a strong resemblance to that of Pollock's wife, Lee Krasner. Hope's memories recapitulate the dilemma of an artist whose personal expression is thwarted by marriage and the omnipresence of alcohol and drugs, and since this is Updike country, Hope is more than candid about her sex life with Zack (Pollock); her second husband, Guy Holloway (loosely modeled on Warhol); and her third, art critic Jerry Chafetz. Updike's descriptions of landscapes and interiors are painterly in themselves, closely observed and sensuous. On the whole, the novel is a study of the artist as archetype, "a man who in the end loves nothing but his art." On that level it succeeds, but readers who long for plot and action may be disappointed. (Nov. 19)

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