American Colossus: The Triumph of Capitalism 1865–1900

H. W. Brands, Author
H.W. Brands, Doubleday, $35 (624p) ISBN 978-0-385-52333-2
Ebook - 490 pages - 978-0-385-53358-4
Compact Disc - 19 pages - 978-0-307-73746-5
Paperback - 1054 pages - 978-0-7393-7792-5
Paperback - 686 pages - 978-0-307-38677-9
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In this timely study, University of Texas historian Brands (Traitor to His Class) describes the rise of the great corporate capitalists after the Civil War. J. Pierpont Morgan, John D. Rockefeller, and Andrew Carnegie constituted an trinity of power-obsessed individuals who instinctively understood that wealth was the ultimate political weapon. They defined the cold-blooded authority of big business. Fascinating detours away from the tale of corporate empires examine the Reconstruction process in the South, the Indian Wars of the West, the opening of the Great Plains, immigration in the East, and the rise of organized labor and the agrarian reformers. Effectively, excerpts from the first-person accounts of Booker T. Washington, Black Elk, Jacob Riis, and others convey the drama of the time. Perhaps the only significant omission in this fast-paced, engrossing narrative is a tendency to dwell on political doctrines that sought to repudiate or restrain capitalism while only briefly discussing the dogma of Herbert Spencer's social Darwinism, which favored the monopolists. (Oct.)
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