Escape From Camp 14: One Man’s Remarkable Odyssey from North Korea to Freedom in the West

Blaine Harden, Author
Blaine Harden. Viking, $26.95 (205p) ISBN 978-0-670-02332-5
Paperback - 210 pages - 978-0-14-312291-3
Open Ebook - 224 pages - 978-1-101-56126-3
Hardcover - 241 pages - 978-0-230-74873-6
Hardcover - 302 pages - 978-1-61173-452-2
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Open Ebook - 224 pages - 978-1-101-55785-3
Paperback - 256 pages - 978-0-230-75468-3
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Paperback - 251 pages - 978-0-330-51954-0
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With a protagonist born into a life of backbreaking labor, cutthroat rivalries, and a nearly complete absence of human affection, Harden’s book reads like a dystopian thriller. But this isn’t fiction—it’s the biography of Shin Dong-hyuk, the only known person born into one of North Korea’s secretive prison labor camps who has managed to escape and now lives in the U.S. Harden structures Shin’s horrific experience—which includes witnessing the execution of his brother and sister after their escape plan is discovered—around an examination of the role that political imprisonment and forced labor play in North Korea and the country’s fraught relationship with its economically prosperous neighbors South Korea and China While Shin eventually succeeds in escaping North Korea’s brutal dictatorship, adjusting to his new life proves to be extraordinarily difficult, and he wrestles with his complicity in the atrocities of his past—he informed on his mother and other brother, which led to their execution. “I was more faithful to the guards than to my family. We were each other’s spies,” he confesses. Harden wisely avoids depicting the West as a panacea for Shin’s trauma, instead leaving the reader to wonder whether Shin will ever be able to reconcile his past with the present. Harden notes both the difficulty of obtaining information about daily existence in North Korea and of fact-checking such information (including Shin’s own version of events), and the book’s brevity may leave readers wanting more from this brisk, brutal, sorrowful read. (Apr.)
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