A Star Called Henry. Beginning with Irish revolutionary Henry Smart's arrival in New"/>
 

OH, PLAY THAT THING

Roddy Doyle, Author
Roddy Doyle, Author . Viking $24.95 (384p) ISBN 978-0-670-03361-4
Reviewed on: 09/20/2004
Release date: 11/01/2004
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Hardcover - 384 pages - 978-0-676-97687-8
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Paperback - 376 pages - 978-0-676-97688-5
Paperback - 378 pages - 978-0-14-303605-0
Paperback - 352 pages - 978-0-09-947765-5
Analog Audio Cassette - 978-0-7927-3363-8
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Open Ebook - 384 pages - 978-1-4070-1793-8
Hardcover - 352 pages - 978-0-224-07436-0
Hardcover - 6 pages - 978-1-85686-932-4
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Doyle stumbles somewhat in this sequel to his excellent 1999 bestseller, A Star Called Henry. Beginning with Irish revolutionary Henry Smart's arrival in New York City in 1924, the story follows Henry's subsequent adventures in advertising, bootlegging, pornography, unlicensed dentistry and keeping ahead of the former associates who'd like to see him eat a lead sandwich. After encroaching too much on a mobster's turf—and getting lucky with another powerful fellow's kept lady—Henry hightails it to Chicago, where he becomes the unofficial manager of a young Louis Armstrong. Though serendipitously reunited with his beloved wife and the daughter he's never met while trying to rob her employer's house, Henry soon heads back to New York to help Louis make it big. While just as brash and lively as Doyle's earlier novels, this one isn't nearly as focused; the dialogue-heavy narrative is interspersed with shifts in setting, time and plot, and characters appear and disappear with little consequence, their spoken parts hasty, repetitive and often perplexing. Worse, Doyle takes Henry Smart's charm for granted; readers unfamiliar with his previous adventures may roll their eyes at his arrogance and incessant sexual encounters. There's just too much material; any of the novel's numerous strands could have been fleshed out into its own book. That said, the novel is still a lot of improbable fun. Agent, John Sutton . (Nov.)

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