How Proust Can Change Your Life

Alain de Botton, Author
Alain de Botton, Author Pantheon Books $19.95 (160p) ISBN 978-0-679-44275-2
Reviewed on: 03/31/1997
Release date: 04/01/1997
Book - 978-0-676-54266-0
Paperback - 208 pages - 978-0-679-77915-5
Other - 978-0-676-54080-2
Paperback - 978-0-679-78577-4
Paperback - 978-0-679-78576-7
Analog Audio Cassette - 978-1-57270-097-0
Paperback - 215 pages - 978-0-330-35491-2
Hardcover - 978-0-517-28416-2
Hardcover - 978-1-901768-34-3
Hardcover - 978-1-904605-30-0
Compact Disc - 978-1-74214-899-1
MP3 CD - 978-1-74214-920-2
Hardcover - 215 pages - 978-0-330-34762-4
Open Ebook - 115 pages - 978-0-307-83349-5
Compact Disc - 978-1-74314-119-9
Compact Disc - 978-1-74318-325-0
MP3 CD - 978-1-74314-131-1
MP3 CD - 978-1-74318-337-3
Pre-Recorded Audio Player - 978-1-74285-218-8
Show other formats
FORMATS
Generally writers fall into one of two camps: those who feel that one can't write without having a firm grasp on Proust, and those who, like Virginia Woolf, are crippled by his influence. De Botton, the author of On Love, The Romantic Movement and Kiss and Tell, obviously falls into the former category. But rather than an endless exegesis on memory, de Botton has chosen to weave Proust's life, work, friends and era into a gently irreverent, tongue-in-cheek self-help book. For example, in the chapter titled ""How to Suffer Successfully,"" de Botton lists poor Proust's many difficulties (asthma, ""awkward desires,"" sensitive skin, a Jewish mother, fear of mice), which is essentially a funny way of telling the reader quite a lot about the man's life. Next he moves on to Proust's little thesis that because we only really think when distressed, we shouldn't worry about striving for happiness so much as ""pursuing ways to be properly and productively unhappy."" De Botton then cheerily judges various characters of A la recherche against their author's maxims. At the beginning, when de Botton drags his own girlfriend into a tortuous and not terribly successful digression, readers may be skeptical, but they will be won over by his whimsical relation of Proust's lessons--essentially an exhortation to slow down, pay attention and learn from life. Is it profound? No. Does this add something new to Proust scholarship? Probably not. But it's a real pleasure to read someone who treats this sacrosanct subject as something that is still vital and vigorous. 25,000 first printing; author tour.(May)
The Best Books, Emailed Every Week
Tip Sheet!
MORE BOOKS YOU'D LIKE
X