So Much to Be Done: Women Settlers on the Mining and Ranching Frontier

Ruth B. Moynihan, Editor, Christine Fischer Dichamp, Editor, Susan M. Armitage, Editor
Ruth B. Moynihan, Editor, Christine Fischer Dichamp, Editor, Susan M. Armitage, Editor University of Nebraska Press $50 (325p) ISBN 978-0-8032-3134-4
Reviewed on: 05/01/1990
Release date: 05/01/1990
Challenges, defeats and triumphs of the harsh 19th-century American frontier are portrayed vividly through the words of 19 women who wrote of their experiences. Mrs. Lee Whipple-Haslam, whose father died in a barroom fight, describes hard-drinking miners and frontier justice in 1850s California. Mrs. J. W. Likins supports herself and her daughter by traveling to different towns as a ``lady agent'' selling engraved pictures of General Grant. A particularly intrepid woman, Mrs. Nat Collins, is captured by Indians and loses her possessions in a fire but ultimately triumphs to become ``Cattle Queen of Montana.'' Sarah Winnemucca Hopkins, daughter of a Piute chief, recalls the forced midwinter relocation of her tribe from their Nevada homeland to the Yakima reservation in eastern Washington. In Colorado territory, Sister Blandina Segale (a nun) stops a lynch mob and prevents an illegal attempt to take over a mine. Moynihan wrote Rebel for Rights: Abigail Scott Duniway ; Armitage is co-editor of The Women's West ; and Dichamp edited Let Them Speak for Themselves: Women in the American West, 1849-1900. Illustrations not seen by PW. BOMC, QPB and History Book Club selections. (July)
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