THE LEMON TABLE: Stories

Julian Barnes, Author
Julian Barnes, Author . Knopf $22.95 (256p) ISBN 978-1-4000-4214-2
Compact Disc - 978-1-4915-3247-8
MP3 CD - 978-1-4915-3267-6
Hardcover - 213 pages - 978-0-224-07198-7
Hardcover - 256 pages - 978-0-679-31303-8
Book - 978-0-7927-3407-9
Book - 978-0-7927-3408-6
Paperback - 256 pages - 978-0-679-31304-5
Paperback - 241 pages - 978-1-4000-7650-5
Open Ebook - 120 pages - 978-0-307-42889-9
Paperback - 213 pages - 978-0-330-42692-3
Open Ebook - 224 pages - 978-1-4464-4855-7
Open Ebook - 1 pages - 978-1-299-01596-8
Hardcover - 978-0-330-43354-9
Paperback - 213 pages - 978-0-09-955499-8
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Polished and classically structured, the 11 exquisite stories in this collection are as stylish as any of Barnes's creations, while also possessed of a pleasing heft. Told from a dazzling array of viewpoints, each is underpinned with a familiar Barnes concern: death. In "The Revival," the Russian writer Turgenev ruminates on lost love at the end of his life (as Tolstoy looks on), while in "Hygiene" a WWII vet revisits more than just his old mates during an annual trip to London for his regimental dinner. The past is seen from the perspective of the barber's chair in "A Short History of Hairdressing," and from two entirely separate angles in "The Things You Know," about a pair of widows who mentally savage each other over the course of a polite breakfast. Fans of Barnes's conversational novels, such as Love, Etc. and Talking It Over , may be nonplussed by the Dinesen-like sonority of the prose in "The Story of Mats Israelson" ("When Havlar Berggren succumbed to akvavit, frivolity and atheism, and transferred ownership of the third stall to an itinerant knife-grinder, it was on Berggren, not the knife-grinder, that disapproval fell, and a more suitable appointment was made in exchange for a few riksdaler"), but readers willing to follow Barnes's imagination will not be disappointed. With the exception of the plodding last story, "The Silence" (in which the title phrase is explained: "Among the Chinese, the lemon is the symbol of death"), the author handles his dark subject matter with grace and humor. This is not a morbid trip. Instead, Barnes always has his eye on something unusual, and the reader is taken for a delightful ride. Agent, Helen Brann. (July 9)

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