Woman and Madness, explores the "shadow side" of sisterhood: women treating each other badly. How could her own mother "/>
 

WOMAN'S INHUMANITY TO WOMAN

Phyllis Chesler, Author, Phyllis Chessler, Author
Phyllis Chesler, Author, Phyllis Chessler, Author . Thunder's Mouth/ Nation Books $22.95 (400p) ISBN 978-1-56025-351-8
Reviewed on: 02/25/2002
Release date: 01/01/2002
Paperback - 560 pages - 978-0-452-28408-1
Paperback - 551 pages - 978-1-55652-946-7
Open Ebook - 575 pages - 978-1-56976-276-9
Open Ebook - 577 pages - 978-1-306-03422-7
Open Ebook - 576 pages - 978-1-56976-278-3
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Chesler, author of the bestselling Woman and Madness, explores the "shadow side" of sisterhood: women treating each other badly. How could her own mother have been so mean to her? How could someone who "borrowed" published ideas from her not acknowledge her or say "thank you"? In this treatise on breaking the "cycle of cruelty" between women, controversial feminist Chesler addresses why sisters fight, why some women prefer to work for men rather than for women, and other highly subjective cases of woman/woman cruelty. From the "demented Demeters" and "murderous Electras" of Greek mythology to modern-day Mommie Dearest, Chesler warns, mothers and daughters are doomed. Whether they acknowledge their mothers' viciousness, as Chesler does, or whether they're "unconscious" and suffer "amnesia" about the hurt, she says, the patterns are set. Throughout girlhood and into adult life, women repeat the basic lesson—in Chesler's words, "maternal envy teaches daughters to be passive, fearful, conformist, obedient—as well as similarly cruel to other women." Thus, she says, "an assertive woman manager might be viewed as bitchy and non-maternal." This comment is certainly more digestible than, say, "what complicates the aging process is a woman's life-long experience of all other women as rivals and potential replacements." Chesler draws her evidence from interviews with an unspecified group of women with horror stories: backstabbing by feminist colleagues, sadistic gynecologists, battering lesbians, etc. Needless to say, her book sometimes comes off as quite cynical, despite her claim that "I would like women to treat each other in good ways." (Mar.)

Forecast:It's prickly and contentious, but it's Chesler—so expect some buzz in the academic feminist circles she inhabits.

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