Native Speaker and A Gesture Life ) approaches the problems of race and belonging in America from"/>
 

ALOFT

Chang-Rae Lee, Author
Chang-Rae Lee, Author . Riverhead $24.95 (352p) ISBN 978-1-57322-263-1
Reviewed on: 03/01/2004
Release date: 03/01/2004
Hardcover - 368 pages - 978-0-7475-6693-9
Open Ebook - 384 pages - 978-1-101-21727-6
Hardcover - 352 pages - 978-0-7475-7846-8
Pre-Recorded Audio Player - 978-1-61637-411-2
Book - 1 pages - 978-1-59887-320-7
Compact Disc - 978-1-56511-889-8
Analog Audio Cassette - 978-1-56511-888-1
Hardcover - 451 pages - 978-1-58724-677-7
Ebook - 978-0-7865-4515-5
Ebook - 978-0-7865-4516-2
Ebook - 978-0-7865-4517-9
Paperback - 369 pages - 978-1-59448-070-6
Hardcover - 495 pages - 978-0-7540-7978-1
Hardcover - 352 pages - 978-0-7475-7240-4
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Lee's third novel (after Native Speaker and A Gesture Life ) approaches the problems of race and belonging in America from a new angle—the perspective of Jerry Battle, the semiretired patriarch of a well-off (and mostly white) Long Island family. Sensitive but emotionally detached, Jerry escapes by flying solo in his small plane even as he ponders his responsibilities to his loved ones: his irascible father, Hank, stewing in a retirement home; his son, Jack, rashly expanding the family landscaping business; Jerry's graduate student daughter, Theresa, engaged to Asian-American writer Paul and pregnant but ominously secretive; and Jerry's long-time Puerto Rican girlfriend, Rita, who has grown tired of two decades of aloofness and left him for a wealthy lawyer. Jack and Theresa's mother was Jerry's Korean-American wife, Daisy, who drowned in the swimming pool after a struggle with mental illness when Jack and Theresa were children, and Theresa's angry postcolonial take on ethnicity and exploitation is met by Jerry's slightly bewildered efforts to understand his place in a new America. Jerry's efforts to win back Rita, Theresa's failing health and Hank's rebellion against his confinement push the meandering narrative along, but the novel's real substance comes from the rich, circuitous paths of Jerry's thoughts—about family history and contemporary culture—as his family draws closer in a period of escalating crisis. Lee's poetic prose sits well in the mouth of this aging Italian-American whose sentences turn unexpected corners. Though it sometimes seems that Lee may be trying to embody too many aspects of 21st-century American life in these individuals, Jerry's humble and skeptical voice and Lee's genuine compassion for his compromised characters makes for a truly moving story about a modern family. Agent, Amanda Urban . Foreign rights sold in France, Germany, Holland and the U.K. (Mar.)

Forecast: Comparable to Updike's later Rabbit novels and Begley's About Schmidt, Aloft broadens Lee's scope and should bump his sales and reputation up another notch.

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