Bunker Hill: A City, a Siege, a Revolution

Nathaniel Philbrick, Author
Nathaniel Philbrick. Viking, $32.95 (416p) ISBN 978-0-670-02544-2
Paperback - 396 pages - 978-0-14-312532-7
Hardcover - 817 pages - 978-1-4104-5778-3
Ebook - 576 pages - 978-1-4464-6305-5
Compact Disc - 978-1-61176-165-8
Hardcover - 398 pages - 978-0-85752-044-9
Paperback - 815 pages - 978-1-59413-693-1
Hardcover - 416 pages - 978-0-85752-045-6
Hardcover - 570 pages - 978-0-85750-083-0
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Like most popular historians, Philbrick (Mayflower) writes about discrete events, not large developments. And he’s good at it, even if the larger context is rarely considered and critical analysis gives way to story and celebration. Here, his focus is on events that began with the humiliations of the British at Lexington and Concord and ended with the siege of Boston, the American victory at Bunker Hill in 1775, and the departure in 1776 of British forces from New England’s largest city. Philbrick correctly presents the battle at Bunker Hill as a critical moment in the opening stages of the War for Independence, and displays an empathy for the out-maneuvered British caught in the traps that the Patriots laid for them. He wisely makes as one of his central figures the Patriots’ charismatic leader, Joseph Warren, who was killed at Bunker Hill, and who has since been largely forgotten, despite having been the man responsible for “orchestrating the on-the-ground reality of a revolution.” Philbrick tells his tale in traditional fashion—briskly, colorfully, and with immediacy. The book would have benefited from a point of view more firmly grounded in a contemporary evaluation of the battle, but even as it is—no one has told this tale better. Agent: Stuart Krichevsky, Stuart Krichevsky Literary Agency, Inc. (May)
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