A tinted review in adult Forecasts indicates a book that's of exceptional importance to our readers, but hasn't received a starred or boxed review.

 

FROM A BUICK 8

Stephen King, Author
Stephen King, Author . Scribner $28 (368p) ISBN 978-0-7432-1137-6
Compact Disc - 978-0-7435-8161-5
Downloadable Audio - 978-0-7435-6333-8
Downloadable Audio - 978-1-4498-8344-7
Analog Audio Cassette - 978-0-7435-2095-9
Hardcover - 512 pages - 978-0-7432-2847-3
Compact Disc - 12 pages - 978-0-7435-2096-6
Hardcover - 978-0-684-01716-7
Mass Market Paperbound - 487 pages - 978-1-4165-2431-1
Hardcover - 368 pages - 978-0-684-01715-0
Ebook - 368 pages - 978-0-7432-4679-8
Mass Market Paperbound - 487 pages
Prebound-Other - 978-0-613-70739-8
Paperback - 496 pages - 978-0-340-98038-5
Hardcover - 368 pages - 978-0-684-01714-3
Hardcover - 512 pages - 978-1-4000-0314-3
Mass Market Paperbound - 496 pages - 978-0-7434-5737-8
Hardcover - 528 pages - 978-0-340-77069-6
Paperback - 467 pages - 978-0-340-95266-5
Paperback - 467 pages - 978-1-4447-0811-0
Show other formats
FORMATS

A tinted review in adult Forecasts indicates a book that's of exceptional importance to our readers, but hasn't received a starred or boxed review.

FROM A BUICK 8Stephen King. Scribner, $28 (368p) ISBN 0-7432-1137-5

King, we learn in an author's note, hashed out the plot of this gripper while driving from western Pennsylvania to New York. The first draft took two months to write. That's quick work, and it's reflected in the book's simplicity of plot and theme; unlike King's chewy last novel, Dreamcatcher, this one goes down like a shot of moonshine, hot and clean, much like Cujo, say, or Gerald's Game. In 1979, an odd man drives what at first glance looks like a 1954 mint-quality Buick Roadmaster up to a service station in rural Pennsylvania, then vanishes, leaving behind the car. The state police of Troop D deposit the vehicle in a shed near their barracks, where, up to the present, it remains a secret from all but cop colleagues—for the car isn't exactly a car; it may be alive, and it certainly serves as a doorway between our world and... what? Another dimension? Another galaxy? The troopers never find out, despite their amateurish scientific investigations of it and of the weird beings that occasionally emerge from the vehicle's trunk: freaky fish, creepy flowers and more. Moreover, the "car" is dangerous: the day it appears, a state trooper disappears, and experiments over the years with cockroaches, etc., indicate that just as the car can spew things out, it will ingest them. While the book's relative brevity and simplicity does lend comparison to earlier King, and King has relied on a nasty car before (Christine), the author's stylistic maturity manifests in his sophisticated handling of the round robin of narrators (both first and third-person), the sharp portrayal of police ways and mores and the novel's compelling subthemes (loyalty, generational bondings) and primary theme: that life is filled with Buick 8s, phenomena that blindside us and that we can never understand. This novel isn't major King, but it's nearly flawless—and one terrific entertainment. (On sale Sept. 24)

The Best Books, Emailed Every Week
Tip Sheet!
MORE BOOKS YOU'D LIKE
X