The Birchbark House

Louise Erdrich, Author, Louise Erdrich, Illustrator, Louise Erdich, Author
Louise Erdrich, Author, Louise Erdrich, Illustrator, Louise Erdich, Author Hyperion Books $17.99 (256p) ISBN 978-0-7868-0300-2
Hardcover - 256 pages - 978-0-7868-2241-6
Hardcover - 272 pages - 978-0-7862-2178-3
Analog Audio Cassette - 978-1-883332-79-2
Paperback - 244 pages - 978-0-7868-1454-1
Downloadable Audio - 978-0-7927-8707-5
Prebound-Other - 978-0-606-24620-0
Prebound-Glued - 256 pages - 978-0-613-59384-7
Compact Disc - 5 pages - 978-1-883332-83-9
Prebound-Sewn - 224 pages - 978-0-7569-1186-7
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Erdrich's (Grandmother's Pigeon) debut novel for children is the first in a projected cycle of books centering on an Ojibwa family on an island in Lake Superior. Opening in the summer of 1847, the story follows the family, in a third-person narrative, through four seasons; it focuses on young Omakayas, who turns ""eight winters old"" during the course of the novel. In fascinating, nearly step-by-step details, the author describes how they build a summer home out of birchbark, gather with extended family to harvest rice in the autumn, treat an attack of smallpox during the winter and make maple syrup in the spring to stock their own larder and to sell to others. Against the backdrop of Ojibwa cultural traditions, Omakayas also conveys the universal experiences of childhood--a love of the outdoors, a reluctance to do chores, devotion to a pet--as well as her ability to cope with the seemingly unbearable losses of the winter. The author hints at Omakayas's unusual background and her calling as a healer, as well as the imminent dangers of the ""chimookoman"" or white people, setting the stage for future episodes. Into her lyrical narrative, Erdrich weaves numerous Ojibwa words, effectively placing them in context to convey their meanings. Readers will want to follow this family for many seasons to come. Ages 9-up. (May)
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