How We Know What Isn't So: The Fallibility of Human Reason in Everyday Life

Thomas Gilovich, Author Free Press $19.95 (216p) ISBN 978-0-02-911705-7
Sports fans who think that basketball players shoot in ``hot streaks,'' and maternity nurses who maintain that more babies are born when the moon is full adhere to erroneous beliefs, according to Gilovich, associate professor of psychology at Cornell. With examples ranging from the spread of AIDS to the weight of Scholastic Aptitude Test scores, he skewers popular but mistaken assumptions. Faulty reasoning from incomplete or ambiguous data, a tendency to seek out ``hypothesis-confirming evidence'' and the habit of self-serving belief are among the factors Gilovich pinpoints in his sophisticated anaylsis. However, in the book's second half, his debunking of holistic medicine, ESP and paranormal phenomena is superficial and one-sided, marred by some of the very tendencies he effectively exposes in the ``true believers.'' (June)
Reviewed on: 04/29/1991
Release date: 05/01/1991
Open Ebook - 224 pages - 978-1-4391-0674-7
Paperback - 224 pages - 978-0-02-911706-4
Show other formats
FORMATS
Discover what to read next
TIP SHEET
MORE BOOKS YOU'D LIKE
X
X