The Politics of Vision: Essays on Nineteenth-Century Art and Society

Linda Nochlin, Author HarperCollins Publishers $26.95 (200p) ISBN 978-0-06-435854-5
In nine essays accompanied by 62 plates, Nochlin ( Women, Art, and Power ) incisively questions the canonization of artists while examining the subordination of women as reflected in Western painting. She reminds us that the term ``avant-garde'' was once applied to Gustave Courbet's militantly radical realism. She laments Degas's ``simpleminded anti-Semitism,'' yet finds that his prejudice, with a few flagrant exceptions, had little or no effect on his art. She traces a latent ideology of male domination and colonialism in the artificial orientalism of Eugene Delacroix and Jean-Leon Gerome. In the Belgian Leon Frederic's proletarian triptych Stages of a Worker's Life she perceives a reactionary clinging to fatalistic religious beliefs. Other pieces deal with Seurat, Manet, Pissarro, Puerto Rican realist painter Francisco Oller, and French reporter-illustrator Paul Renouard, whose drawing of long-suffering weavers influenced Van Gogh. (Jan.)
Reviewed on: 01/01/1990
Release date: 01/01/1990
Paperback - 224 pages - 978-0-06-430187-9
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