General W.B. Smith as Dir. CIA-CL.

Ludwell Montague, Author, Allan E. Goodman, Illustrator, Bruce D. Berkowitz, Illustrator Pennsylvania State University Press $51.95 (308p) ISBN 978-0-271-00750-2
Declassified under the Historical Review Program the CIA authorized in 1985, this inside account by Montague, once the executive assistant to CIA director Walter Bedell Smith, tells how the modern intelligence community was established and expanded after WW II. Montague reveals how Smith, named the CIA's fourth director in 1950, defined the agency's role and responsibilities and reorganized it in light of mounting Soviet subversion and the outbreak of the Korean War. Montague, who died in 1972, also discusses Smith's still-reverberating reputation as the CIA's resident ``ogre,'' arguing that his irritable impatience was a managerial technique meant to masked an essentially kind nature. The study sheds considerable light on the birth of the modern national security state. Montague participated in many of the events chronicled here. (Aug.)
Reviewed on: 07/29/1991
Release date: 08/01/1991
Paperback - 336 pages - 978-0-271-03048-7
Paperback - 336 pages - 978-0-271-00751-9
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