Repeal of the Blues

Alan Pomerance, Author Citadel Press $17.95 (264p) ISBN 978-0-8065-1105-4
In this story of the desegregation of blacks in the American entertainment world which colorfully, passionately chronicles their achievements in Hollywood, Las Vegas, radio and TV between 1932 and 1952, playwright Pomerance declares that, without these effects, the civil rights movement could never have evolved. The complex struggles of such singers, dancers, actors and musicians as Lena Horne, Paul Robeson, Bill Robinson and Sammy Davis Jr. are shown to exemplify the social changes that have taken place. Separate chapters describe the problems of black entertainers in WW II, their tribulations during the Cold War period and the McCarthy era, and the contributions of white impresarios John Hammond, Barney Josephson and Max Gordon. Pomerance notes that the efforts initiated during this period brought the perception of black entertainment from the obsequious Stepin Fetchit image to today's Michael Jackson fashion-plate glitz. (Nov.)
Reviewed on: 11/03/1988
Release date: 11/01/1988
Paperback - 16 pages - 978-0-8065-1244-0
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