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What's on for fall once you get past the predictably fun books by celebrity chefs; the guides for making cupcakes, whoopie pies, handheld pies, and other cute little baked goods; and the still-going-strong barrage of titles about eating less meat? Books about eating more meat, of course—provided that meat is grass-fed, organic, local, and singing "If You're Happy and You Know It" on its way to the slaughterhouse. Beneath all that? Take a look: here come the chefs.

The cooler weather will bring new takes on well-trod ground from two beloved cookbook authors. Lidia Bastianich brings it with Lidia's Italy in America, which contains 175 recipes that reflect the diversity of Italian America, and Jacques Pépin's Essential Pepin: More Than 700 All-Time Favorites from My Life in Food promises a mix of modern and nostalgic dishes.

There are a rash of new titles that visit the chef at home. James Beard Award–winner and Iron Chef champ John Besh follows up his 2009 My New Orleans with My Family Table: A Passionate Plea for Home Cooking. Heston Blumenthal, whose $250 Big Fat Duck Cookbook emptied wallets in 2008, explains how science can make your dinner taste better in Heston at Home. Stephanie Izard, the only woman to win Top Chef so far, and owner of Chicago's Girl & the Goat, gives us a peek into her thought and cooking process in Girl in the Kitchen. And Andrew Carmellini, former chef of New York's A Voce, now cooking at the city's Locanda Verde, and winner of a Beard Award for Urban Italian, doesn't quite take the home cookin' tack, but his American Flavor does have a homey angle, with its look at the ingredients and cuisines of our nation's food.

Some major restaurant books are on the way, including 40 Years of Chez Panisse: The Power of Gathering by Alice Waters "and friends," a scrapbook of sorts that pays homage to the influential California restaurant. The crave-worthy desserts at David Chang's Momofuku restaurants get their due in Momofuku Milk Bar by Christina Tosi. And finally, the long-awaited Eleven Madison Park: The Cookbook by Will Guidara and Daniel Humm, based on Danny Meyer's elegant New York restaurant, is slated for November.

Touching on many of this fall's themes—and simultaneously defying categorization—is The Art of Living According to Joe Beef: A Cookbook of Sorts by David McMillan, Frédéric Morin, and Meredith Erickson. While it is tied to a restaurant (Montreal bistro Joe Beef), it makes nods to regular folks, too, including, for instance, instructions for building a backyard smoker. But with recipes for Swedish sandwiches, recollections of favorite train trips, and a love letter to French burgundy, this is one cookbook that—happily, for us—eschews all the trends.

PW's Top 10 Cookbaooks

Lidia's Italy in America
Lidia Bastianich. Knopf, Oct.

Essential Pépin: More Than 700 All-Time Favorites from My Life in Food
Jacques Pépin. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Oct.

My Family Table: A Passionate Plea for Home Cooking
John Besh. Andrews McMeel, Nov.

Heston at Home
Heston Blumenthal. Bloomsbury, Oct.

Girl in the Kitchen: How a Top Chef Cooks, Thinks, Shops, Eats & Drinks
Stephanie Izard. Chronicle, Oct.

American Flavor
Andrew Carmellini. Ecco, Oct.

40 Years of Chez Panisse:
The Power of Gathering
Alice Waters and Friends. Clarkson Potter, Aug.

Momofuku Milk Bar
Christina Tosi. Clarkson Potter, Oct.

Eleven Madison Park: The Cookbook
Will Guidara and Daniel Humm. Little, Brown, Nov.

The Art of Living According to Joe Beef: A Cookbook of Sorts
David McMillan, Frédéric Morin, and Meredith Erickson. Ten Speed, Oct.

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