Subscriber-Only Content; You must be a PW subscriber to access the backissue database. PW has integrated its print and digital subscriptions, offering exciting new benefits to subscribers, who are now entitled to both the print edition and the digital edition via our app or online. For more information on PW's new integrated subscription plan, click here. If you are currently a PW subscriber, click "Login" for full access to the site (if you have not done so already, you will need to set up your account for the new system by going here), or click the "Subscribe" button to become a PW subscriber. Email service@publishersweekly.com with questions.

Login or Subscribe
Astonishing Animals

Anita Ganeri, illus. by Fiammetta Dogi and Dan Cole. Bonnier/Little Bee (S&S, dist.), $12.99 (18p) ISBN 978-1-4998-0016-6

First in the Record Breakers series, this guide (first published in the U.K. in 2013) is devoted to animals that possess exceptional predatory skills, size, senses, intelligence, and life cycles, among others. More than a dozen animals crowd each spread, paired with brief, informal tidbits about them (a sharp-nosed frog “can leap 100 times its own body length—that’s a long jump record!”). Flaps lift to reveal additional animals, while some low-key pop-ups spice up the pages (in one, a kangaroo joey peers out of its mother’s pouch). With an array of zoological trivia and a mix of illustration styles that range from naturalistic to cartoony, there’s plenty to intrigue animal lovers. Available simultaneously: Mechanical Marvels. Ages 5–10. (Mar.)

Reviewed on 03/27/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
Welcome to the Neighborwood

Shawn Sheehy. Candlewick, $29.99 (18p) ISBN 978-0-7636-6594-4

Sheehy makes an impressive children’s book debut, using dramatically unfolding pop-ups to introduce seven woodland animals with special construction skills of their own. In gracefully orchestrated spreads featuring crisp, cut-paper artwork, the animals appear alongside the structures they make: a honeybee rests on the wall of her hive, its golden combs remarkably dimensional; a beaver presides over its watery habitat (“If he can’t find a pond to build in, he makes one!”); and a land snail’s shell grows as “calcium and proteins ooze from folds on his back.” Sheehy describes each animal’s behaviors using succinct yet vivid language, and a closing scene brings all seven animals together to emphasize the interdependence of their “neighborhood,” one that humans are part of, too. A visually striking and enriching overview of animals living independently and as part of an ecosystem. Ages 4–8. (Mar.)

Reviewed on 03/27/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
Madame Sonia Delaunay

Gérard Lo Monaco, trans. from the French by Abigail Grater. Tate (Abrams, dist.), $19.95 (18p) ISBN 978-1-84976-334-9

Readers get a pop-up tour of the paintings, drawings, and costume designs of artist Sonia Delaunay (1885–1979) in an engaging, small-format book that feels like something of an art piece itself. Throughout, Lo Monaco’s playful rhymes encourage readers to analyze, contemplate, and react to Delaunay’s abstract forms. “Harsh moustaches and slithering snakes? That is simply frightful!/ Sticky worms and ocean waves? That’s much more delightful!” reads the text accompanying an untitled 1948 work, whose blue, black, and red squiggles slide left and right thanks to horizontal cuts in the page. In a standout spread, flaps unfold to reveal angular costume designs dating to the 1920s. This intriguing introduction to Delaunay’s work should leave art aficionados eager to learn more about her. Ages 3–7. (Apr.)

Reviewed on 03/27/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
Polar Bear’s Underwear

Tupera Tupera. Chronicle, $16.99 (32p) ISBN 978-1-4521-4199-2

When Polar Bear loses his underwear, his friend Mouse offers to help. Briefs-shaped die-cuts reveal different vividly patterned underwear that could belong to Polar Bear. “This pair has treats all over it. It looks delicious! ‘Is this your pair, Polar Bear?’ ” asks Mouse, opposite a page showcasing yellow briefs decorated with cakes, candies, and snacks. Turning each page reveals the underwear’s actual owner—in this case, it’s Pig, who blissfully chows down on a doughnut in his undies. After a few more tries, Polar Bear discovers that his pair wasn’t really lost—just invisible against his white fur (something sharp-eyed readers may have noticed from the outset). Working in collage, Japanese design firm Tupera Tupera uses a variety of textiles and textures create the chunky animal cast (Squid’s polka-dot underwear has holes for all 10 of his legs, while Bunny wears her carrot-themed briefs on her head), giving readers many moments to giggle over. Ages 3–5. (Mar.)

Reviewed on 03/27/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
Fish Food

Andy Mansfield, illus. by Henning Löhlein. Bonnier/Little Bee (S&S, dist.), $9.99 (14p) ISBN 978-1-4998-0044-9

In a tall, skinny book with die-cut pages and a fun pop-up effect, “a little sea worm swims around, happy as can be.” It is quickly devoured by an orange fish, who pops up from the center of a spread with a “Chomp!” But this victory is short-lived, as other sea creatures, tucked into the periphery of the murky green-blue reef, sound warnings: “Watch out, little fish!” With a page turn, a larger, polka-dotted fish’s jaws close on the orange fish (and the worm, still inside its mouth); an enormous gray fish swallows the whole lot of them a few pages later. Despite the eat-and-be-eaten nature of Mansfield’s underwater world, Löhlein’s goofy, googly-eyed sea creatures keep the mood light. Whether an even bigger fish lurks in the sea is left to readers’ imaginations. Ages 2–5. (Apr.)

Reviewed on 03/27/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
Stonewall: Breaking Out in the Fight for Gay Rights

Ann Bausum. Viking, $16.99 (128p) ISBN 978-0-670-01679-2

Bausum (Stubby the War Dog) offers a powerful and moving account of the pivotal Stonewall riots of 1969 and the struggle for gay rights in the U.S. The riots occurred after police raided the Stonewall Inn, a grungy, mafia-run gay bar in New York City’s Greenwich Village neighborhood. “The tension of that night and countless previous nights and hundreds of lifetimes of abuse burst the dams of person after person. The crowd became a mob, and the mob began to riot.” Bausum’s conversational storytelling whisks readers back to an era when homosexuality was criminalized; after a brief introduction to the night of the raid (“For starters, there was a full moon. And it was beastly hot”), the narrative backtracks a decade to set the context for the violent demonstrations that ensued. A fast-paced accounting reveals how the first riot unfolded, both inside and outside the bar. Final chapters bring the battle for gay civil rights up to the present, with particular attention paid to the AIDS epidemic, pride parades, and the fight for marriage equality. Archival photos, source notes, and a bibliography are included. Ages 12–up. (May)

Reviewed on 03/27/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
The Awesome

Eva Darrows. Rebellion/Ravenstone (S&S, dist.), $9.99 trade paper (352p) ISBN 978-1-78108-324-6

Raised by a monster-hunting single mother, 17-year-old Maggie Cunningham is highly trained in combat, but out of her depth when it comes to being a normal teenager. In order to graduate to hunting the fiercest creatures, including vampires, Maggie must lose her virginity. “The problem with vampires is they love virgins, and not in the biblical humpy-humpy way. They love to eat them,” Maggie explains. “Until I did the nasty with a dong of my choosing, I was a liability.” Before she can do the deed, a run-in with a vampire prince gives her strange powers and heightened senses. Blisteringly funny and unrepentantly crass, Maggie’s hard-edged narration is the soul of Maggie’s story, which thoughtfully explores her complicated relationships with her boyfriend and take-no-prisoners mother. Darrows (who wrote Mary: The Summoning as Hillary Monahan) also delivers some racy sex scenes, ectoplasmic goop and gore aplenty, and a heroine with no shortage of cunning, skill, and power. Readers eagerly anticipating the all-female reboot of Ghostbusters would do very well to read this in the meantime. Ages 15–up. Agent: Miriam Kriss, Irene Goodman Agency. (May)

Reviewed on 03/27/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
The Tenderness of Thieves

Donna Freitas. Philomel, $17.99 (352p) ISBN 978-0-399-17136-9

The summer before her senior year, Jane Calvetti should be enjoying the beach and the company of her three best friends. Instead, she is reliving the terror of a violent break-in that resulted in the death of her father. Against the caution of her friends and many of those in the close-knit New England town where she’s lived her whole life, she becomes involved with local bad boy Handel Davies; despite his brooding eyes, notoriously dangerous friends, and secretive ways, he makes her feel not just safe, but alive and loved. As summer romances go, theirs is full of passion, tenderness, and fun. The good-girl meets bad-boy story line from Freitas (The Survival Kit), a PW contributor, plays out well, and readers will enjoy the chemistry that simmers between Jane and Handel. The mystery of Jane’s father’s death, woven throughout, doesn’t ramp up until the last few pages, at which point savvy readers may not be completely shocked by the final revelation. But for a summer romance with a twist, Freitas delivers. Ages 14–up. Agent: Miriam Altshuler, Miriam Altshuler Literary Agency. (May)

Reviewed on 03/27/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
Made You Up

Francesca Zappia. Greenwillow, $17.99 (448p) ISBN 978-0-06-229010-6

Nothing is what it seems in Zappia’s debut novel. Diagnosed as paranoid schizophrenic at age 14, Alexandra Ridgemont, a senior entering a new high school after an infamous graffiti episode, meets Miles, a boy she believes she conjured in childhood. Her uncertainty and the pressures of a new school create an unraveling of the barriers between imagination and reality. Told from Alex’s perspective, Zappia’s story submerges readers into a world where they, too, are left unsure of what to trust. As the stakes get higher for Alex—with obstacles that include a principal who fanatically worships a scoreboard, a fellow student buckling under family pressure, and her mother’s threats of hospitalizing her—the truth continues to blur. Despite support from Miles, who comes to her aid even as he struggles with an abusive father and alexithymia, Alex must push past increasingly frightening hallucinations to uncover a surprising secret. Though some of the novel’s big revelations are easily guessed and loose ends left dangling, Alex’s sardonic voice and the rapid, Heathers-like dialogue will hold readers’ interest. Ages 14–up. Agent: Louise Fury, Bent Agency. (May)

Reviewed on 03/27/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
The Cost of All Things

Maggie Lehrman. HarperCollins/Balzer + Bray, $17.99 (416p) ISBN 978-0-06-232074-2

Ari, Markos, Kay, and Win live in a version of our world in which a person can visit witchlike hekamists to request a spell—to forget someone (Ari), to find the will to live (Win), to be beautiful and have friends (Kay), or to relieve the weight of the world (Markos). Lehrman, a children’s book editor making her debut as a novelist, alternates perspective among these four protagonists, delivering a story that is squarely grounded in reality, despite its distinct paranormal overlay. Lehrman’s prose pulses with dark emotion—loss, grief, rage, frustration, confusion, doomed love, loneliness—and the steady desperation of her characters is both disturbing and compelling. The characters’ voices can sound overly similar at times, and the things that are left unsaid by everyone are so subtle that the book’s closing revelation may prove more confusing than illuminating to some readers. But Lehrman is adept at digging underneath the surface of her characters and bringing up what’s underneath into the glaring light, however uncomfortable this might make them—or readers. Ages 14–up. Agent: Tina Wexler, ICM. (May)

Reviewed on 03/27/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
X
Stay ahead with
Tip Sheet!
Free newsletter: the hottest new books, features and more
X
X
X
Email Address

Password

Log In Lost Password

PW has integrated its print and digital subscriptions, offering exciting new benefits to subscribers, who are now entitled to both the print edition and the digital editions of PW (online or via our app). For instructions on how to set up your accout for digital access, click here. For more information, click here.

The part of the site you are trying to access is now available to subscribers only. Subscribers: to set up your digital subscription with the new system (if you have not done so already), click here. To subscribe, click here.

Email pw@pubservice.com with questions.

Not Registered? Click here.