Subscriber-Only Content; You must be a PW subscriber to access the backissue database. PW has integrated its print and digital subscriptions, offering exciting new benefits to subscribers, who are now entitled to both the print edition and the digital edition via our app or online. For more information on PW's new integrated subscription plan, click here. If you are currently a PW subscriber, click "Login" for full access to the site (if you have not done so already, you will need to set up your account for the new system by going here), or click the "Subscribe" button to become a PW subscriber. Email service@publishersweekly.com with questions.

Login or Subscribe
How to Look After Your Puppy

Helen Piers, illus. by Kate Sutton. Quarto/Wide Eyed Editions, $9.99 (32p) ISBN 978-1-84780-699-4

Piers coaches readers on raising a puppy in one of two books launching the Pet Cadets series (How to Look After Your Kitten is available simultaneously). She covers a wide range of basics, including things to think about before getting a pet (“Can I afford to care for a dog?”), an overview of a handful of breeds, as well as tips for feeding, training, and helping a puppy to acclimate to a new environment. Accented with bright vermilion, Sutton’s digital illustrations are reminiscent of Stephen Huneck’s work, and sidebars (marked with paw prints) catalog important tidbits about puppy care. A short, handy guide to dog ownership that highlights both the responsibilities and joys entailed. Ages 5–up. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 07/03/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
A Lucky Author Has a Dog

Mary Lyn Ray, illus. by Steven Henry. Scholastic/Levine, $16.99 (40p) ISBN 978-0-545-51876-5

An author describes the habits, pitfalls, and quirks of her work, with her scrappy fuzzy dog close at hand. The dog stays nearby when she’s writing and joins her for walks past brownstones, cafes, and a bookstore, lovingly depicted in illustrations infused with a sense of calmness. For all Ray’s emphasis on the pleasures of having a dog, the book is really about the routines of a writer—school visits, idea-gathering, odd hours, etc. It may demystify the writing life for some curious readers, but it’s an oddly rambling, inward-looking attempt to do so. Ages 4–8. Author’s agent: Erin Murphy, Erin Murphy Literary Agency. Illustrator’s agent: Robin Rue, Writers House. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 07/03/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
Stay! A Top Dog Story

Alex Latimer. Peachtree, $16.95 (32p) ISBN 978-1-56145-884-4

Before Ben leaves his rambunctious dog, Buster, with his grandfather while he’s away on vacation, the boy draws up extensive illustrated instructions for Buster’s care. The notes, integrated throughout Latimer’s story, include lists of Buster’s likes (“Sleeping on Dad’s pillow”) and dislikes (“Sad movies” like Old Yeller), and images of things (like the moon and clouds) that Buster will chase. Ben sends postcards with additional notes for Grandpa, who gives Buster some serious obedience training after an ill-fated—and hilarious—trip to the post office. It’s a funny take on loving an “exhausting” dog, and the way that training can help a dog make big strides with its behavior. Most of the time. Ages 4–8. (Sept.)

Reviewed on 07/03/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
My Dog, Bob

Richard Torrey. Holiday House, $16.95 (32p) ISBN 978-0-8234-3386-5

An unnamed boy introduces his floppy-eared dog, Bob, whose talents include cooking, playing golf, and driving a car—not to mention talking. When a neighbor, Mimi—who looks a little bit like Charles Schulz’s Sally Brown, but acts like Lucy Van Pelt—claims that her queenly poodle is the better dog, Bob doesn’t exactly rise to the occasion. “We win!” gloats Mimi, after her dog shows off tricks like fetching and sitting. Torrey leaves no question who the real winners are, wrapping up his story with Bob back in the kitchen preparing dinner for the whole family: “Pizza for all!” Subtle visual humor, especially regarding Bob’s exceptional skills, makes this lighthearted story a winner. Ages 4–8. Agent: Ronnie Ann Herman, Herman Agency. (Sept.)

Reviewed on 07/03/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
Lost Dog

Michael Garland. Holiday House, $14.95 (24p) ISBN 978-0-8234-3429-9

In this offbeat I Like to Read title, a butterscotch-colored dog named Pete gets epically lost while driving to his grandmother’s house for her birthday. After exiting the highway and finding himself atop a winding mountain road in the middle of nowhere, he asks directions to Mutt Street from a bird in the desert, a book-reading leopard in the jungle, and other animals (“That way” they all respond) in what begins to feel like an actual around-the-world journey. Garland pares the text down to the bare essentials while his sculptural illustrations give the story a surreal quality that is right in step with the quirky nature of Pete’s globe-trotting voyage. Ages 4–8. (Sept.)

Reviewed on 07/03/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
Dog and Mouse

Michelle Nelson-Schmidt. EDC/Kane Miller, $12.99 (36p) ISBN 978-1-61067-352-5

In a lackluster story of unexpected friendship, a yellow dog searches the woods for a best friend. A gray mouse offers her assistance, and the two spend several seasons trying to find Dog’s perfect friend, not realizing until the final pages that it is Mouse. Nelson-Schmidt’s bold, blocky images, a mix of large single frames and panel sequences, quietly convey the gentle togetherness of a friendship that doesn’t know it is one. Unfortunately, Nelson-Schmidt’s rhymes are often repetitive, convoluted, and strained (“Mouse loved to help. She was just thrilled./ Helping was her favorite and very best skill!”), saddling the story with a slow pace and heavy-handed message. Ages 3–7. (Sept.)

Reviewed on 07/03/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
The Ultimate Pirate Handbook

Libby Hamilton, illus. by Matheiu Leyssenne and Jason Kraft. Candlewick/Templar, $19.99 (20p) ISBN 978-0-7636-7963-7

Hamilton follows The Fairy Tale Handbook and The Monstrous Book of Monsters with an irreverent guide to the pirate life, full of information about crew hierarchy, slang, traditions, legendary ghost ships, and more. Flaps on one spread let readers peer inside a pirate ship as they learn about nautical terminology (they’ll also discover that this particular pirate captain counts a teddy bear among his treasures). Elsewhere, children can give one unlucky pirate an eye patch, as well as multiple peg legs and hooks, by lifting flaps in a section about injuries and diseases. A pop-up hall of fame introduces several notable pirates, including three women, to close out an entertaining book for sprogs looking to become full-fledged sea dogs. Ages 5–8. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 07/03/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
Journey to the Moon: A Pop-Up Lunar Adventure

Andy Mansfield. Bonnier/Little Bee (S&S, dist.), $12.99 (14p) ISBN 978-1-4998-0072-2

Mansfield traces a rocket’s journey to the moon over six vertically oriented spreads—all the better to convey the force needed to achieve liftoff. The pop-up elements in each spread aren’t complicated or ornate, yet they are strikingly effective in their simplicity. Wavy ribbons of smoke and flame pour from the rocket’s base during blast-off, while zigzagging flames and the rocket’s segmented body give later pages something of an Art Deco influence. Mansfield keeps the identity of the rocket’s pilot (mostly) hidden until the final spread, when readers discover that this stylish and playful journey into space is more about homecoming than exploration. Ages 4–8. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 07/03/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
Who’s Hiding?

Agnese Baruzzi. Bonnier/Little Bee (S&S, dist.), $9.99 (16p) ISBN 978-1-4998-0168-2

Italian artist Baruzzi invites readers to unfold large, half-page flaps in order to discover the animals hiding behind them. A skinny red-orange carrot in the center of one scene becomes the ears of a rabbit after the image expands, while a tree’s spindly branches transform into the antlers of a deer after another page opens. The singsong rhymes that offer clues to the animals’ identities tend to be treacly (“Among the palms, two creatures dance./ They twist and flutter, bob and prance”), but Baruzzi’s surreal, stylized illustrations have a haunting, mural-like quality when fully expanded, and the clever ways in which she disguises the animals create a satisfying series of reveals. Ages 3–6. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 07/03/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
And the Cow Said

Katie Cotton, illus. by Vicki Gausden. Bonnier/Little Bee (S&S, dist.), $12.99 (24p) ISBN 978-1-4998-0101-9

It’s nighttime, it’s raining, and all Farmer Bill wants is to sleep. So do the animals on his farm and, one by one, they barge into his house: “A second knock came, so Bill went back./ There stood a duck, and the duck said... Quack!” Small circles labeled “Press” let readers activate a sound chip for 10 animals, including a cat that Bill nearly sits on after he is driven outside and the rooster who awakens him just as he’s fallen asleep on the roof. Cotton’s rhymes can be uneven and forced (“Grumpy and tired, Bill spied the shed./ ‘There’s a chair in there!’ he happily said”), but Farmer Bill’s misadventures should still trigger giggles. Ages 3–6. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 07/03/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
X
Stay ahead with
Tip Sheet!
Free newsletter: the hottest new books, features and more
X
X
X
Email Address

Password

Log In Lost Password

PW has integrated its print and digital subscriptions, offering exciting new benefits to subscribers, who are now entitled to both the print edition and the digital editions of PW (online or via our app). For instructions on how to set up your accout for digital access, click here. For more information, click here.

The part of the site you are trying to access is now available to subscribers only. Subscribers: to set up your digital subscription with the new system (if you have not done so already), click here. To subscribe, click here.

Email pw@pubservice.com with questions.

Not Registered? Click here.