Subscriber-Only Content; You must be a PW subscriber to access the backissue database. PW has integrated its print and digital subscriptions, offering exciting new benefits to subscribers, who are now entitled to both the print edition and the digital edition via our app or online. For more information on PW's new integrated subscription plan, click here. If you are currently a PW subscriber, click "Login" for full access to the site (if you have not done so already, you will need to set up your account for the new system by going here), or click the "Subscribe" button to become a PW subscriber. Email service@publishersweekly.com with questions.

Login or
The Greatest of Marlys

Lynda Barry. Drawn & Quarterly, $29.95 (248p) ISBN 978-1-77046-264-9

Barry is one of American literature’s great chroniclers of childhood. Her comic strips, drawn in disarmingly and deceptively childlike lines, distill the essence of fried bologna sandwiches and stray dogs, mysterious teenage bedrooms, and kickball at dusk. This luminous hardcover collection centers on Barry’s magnum opus, Marlys, a bright, bossy, awkward grade-schooler cloaked in freckles and bravado. Marlys, her sensitive little brother, Freddy, and their cousins Arna and Arnold navigate a world of angry mothers, absent fathers, schoolyard politics, and trailer park drama, ping-ponging between comedy and tragedy. Some strips are heartbreakingly beautiful, others simply heartbreaking. But most are funny, as the kids present on diverse topics as “How to Groove on Life,” “Fumes of Regret,” and “Don’t Freak It’s Only Nature” (“If you don’t like extra pink dangles of flesh, don’t go staring at the star-nosed mole”). This book will bring groovy love into your life. Pinky swear. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 08/12/2016 | Details & Permalink

show more
Bloom County Episode XI: A New Hope

Berkeley Breathed. IDW, $17.99 trade paper (144p) ISBN SBN 978-1-63140-699-7

Reviving his cult-classic comic strip—which ended its original run in 1989—in 2015 was a smart move for Breathed. He posts the strips on Facebook to a large audience without the stress of a daily schedule or the shrinking size of newspaper comics. It’s a fond and familiar return as well as a new start: Opus confronts Google and Twitter; Binkley’s anxiety closet now contains global warming, George Lucas, and man buns. Aside from the modern trappings, it’s a familiar Bloom County, where wit and silliness abound. Breathed’s art is more fluid and detailed than his newspaper days, and his pitch-perfect comic timing confirms this strip’s masterpiece status. It’s beautiful, too, taking advantage of a richer palette of colors than what can be reproduced in newspapers. His characters continue to be relatable and human (including that plump, balding penguin). Even Steve Dallas grows a heart. Bloom County is both an escape from and a mirror to our complicated modern world. (Sept.)

Reviewed on 08/12/2016 | Details & Permalink

show more
Brief Histories of Everyday Objects

Andy Warner. Picador, $20 trade paper (224p) ISBN 978-1-250-07865-0

In this history lesson about the mundane, Warner’s fascination is with the daily objects that clutter your bathroom, bedroom, office, bar, and all the places you frequent without even noticing you’re there. Each strip in this webcomic collection is a breezy romp as Warner recounts the histories of objects such as toothbrushes, toilets, and billiard balls with a tongue-in-cheek wit and glee for some of the more disgusting elements in their origins. Warner reveals in his illustration of an early toothbrush, for instance, a bone with animal hair as bristles. He’s equally interested in the chaos that often follows entrepreneurial initiatives, and each strip, though brief, has the power of a parable, outlining how some inventors were cheated, fell into greed, or used their wealth to attempt to fund new, even quirkier endeavors—like flying off to Bolivia to become a missionary or attempting to build a utopia. Warner is a deft cartoonist, able to convey a lot of information, humor, and emotion within a single panel. (Oct.)

Reviewed on 08/12/2016 | Details & Permalink

show more
Spot 12: Five Months in the Neonatal ICU

Jenny Jaeckel. Raincloud Press, $19.95 trade paper (113p) ISBN 978-1-941203-11-8

When Jaeckel’s daughter, Asa, is born, hospital staff immediately spirit her off to surgery for a malformed trachea. What follows is a long period of recovery and new health issues, as her condition grows more complicated and her parents struggle to accommodate her unique needs. “Shock is a quiet place,” Jaeckel observes in this graphic memoir, “a vault.” Jaeckel is adept at capturing the empty, helpless feeling that comes with knowing her child is suffering and not being able to do anything about it. As in her previous graphic novel, Siberiak, Jaeckel depicts herself and the doctors and friends that constitute her cast of characters as animal-human hybrids. While she gives considerable attention to her own thoughts during this trying time, she also focuses on the medical details surrounding her daughter’s extensive treatment, leading to a very text-heavy graphic novel. Most of the pages have a staid layout: a large caption over a simple illustration, a drab presentation that doesn’t do justice to the dramatic story. (Oct.)

Reviewed on 08/12/2016 | Details & Permalink

show more
X
Stay ahead with
Tip Sheet!
Free newsletter: the hottest new books, features and more
X
X
X
Email Address

Password

Log In Lost Password

PW has integrated its print and digital subscriptions, offering exciting new benefits to subscribers, who are now entitled to both the print edition and the digital editions of PW (online or via our app). For instructions on how to set up your accout for digital access, click here. For more information, click here.

The part of the site you are trying to access is now available to subscribers only. Subscribers: to set up your digital subscription with the new system (if you have not done so already), click here. To subscribe, click here.

Email pw@pubservice.com with questions.

Not Registered? Click here.