Subscriber-Only Content; You must be a PW subscriber to access the Table-of-Contents Database.

Subscribers can click the "login" button below to access the Table-of-Contents Database. (If you have not done so already, you will need to set up your digital access by going here.)

Or for immediate access you can click the "subscribe" link below.

PW “All Access” site license members have access to PW’s subscriber-only website content. Simply close and relaunch your preferred browser to log-in. To find out more about PW’s site license subscription options please email: pw@pubservice.com.

If you have questions or need assistance setting up your account please email pw@pubservice.com or call 1-800-278-2991 (U.S.) or 1-818-487-2069 (all other countries) , Monday-Friday between 5am and 5pm Pacific time for assistance.

For any other questions about PublshersWeekly.com, email service@publishersweekly.com.

Login or

Floral Diplomacy at the White House

Laura Dowling. Stichting Kunstboek, $45 (144p) ISBN 978-90-5856-558-7

Photographs splash colors and flowers on nearly every page of Dowling’s coverage of floral design at the Obama White House. But for all of Dowling’s descriptive powers—and they are admirable—her words beg for even more photography. Nevertheless, Dowling’s book turns a little-known subject into a tasty peek behind the scenes. Dowling was hired by Michelle Obama as White House chief floral designer in 2009, with the goal of “transforming the traditional White House floral program into a new platform for collaboration and innovation.” Dowling excels delightfully in this mission with an essential cadre of volunteers and a minuscule budget. She describes plans and executions of floral work at official events (state dinners for Germany, India, France, etc.), for holidays, and along themes of White House policy, such as conserving the environment. She even recalls interpreting the Obamas’ dogs in pipe cleaners. Unfortunately, she writes too much about herself and repeats too much (“floral diplomacy,” clever once, fades after the first dozen uses). Color photos. (Mar.)

Reviewed on 04/28/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
Everywhere Home: A Life in Essays

Fenton Johnson. Sarabande, $15.95 trade paper (216p) ISBN 978-1-941411-43-8

In this collection of 26 essays, the earliest published in 1989, Johnson (The Man Who Loved Birds) contemplates questions of identity, belonging, and belief. With a deft hand and trained ear for storytelling, he explores growing up Catholic in Kentucky, the complex nature of same-gender eros, and the desire to belong. His work is most poignant when he’s bearing witness to the plague years of the AIDS crisis and its effects on the social and artistic networks of so many LGBTQ people. In the collection’s most moving pieces, he reckons with grief after his lover dies of AIDS-related complications. “From understanding grows compassion; from compassion grows real, enduring, life-affirming change,” writes Johnson. These essays trust in the power of communication to build the capacity for change. (May)

Reviewed on 04/28/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
Beer Drinkers and Hell Raisers: The Rise of Motörhead

Martin Popoff. ECW (Legato, U.S. dist.; Jaguar, Canadian dist.), $18.95 trade paper (272p) ISBN 978-1-77041-347-4

Popoff (Metal Heart), a prolific author who specializes in hard rock and heavy metal music, writes that the speed metal and punk sound of Motörhead is “a hard music to love, music made for lovers of hard music.” That describes his exhaustive book, too. Hardcore fans will be delighted by the extensive interviews with the three members of the original lineup from 1977–82 (Lemmy Kilmister on bass and vocals, “Fast” Eddie Clarke on guitar, and Phil “Philthy Animal” Taylor on drums) and just about every producer, engineer, manager, and musician who worked with the band; even the designer who came up with their demonic logo gets a say. Popoff has a lyrical way with words, describing one album as a “middle finger of a record” and Kilmister with “his caustic caw thrust up at the mike, bass as accompanying weapon.” The side trips looking at other bands in which Motörhead played some part, including Hawkwind, Girlschool, and Twisted Sister, help to establish the music of the time in England—the only place Motörhead ever had a number one record—and provide a welcome break from the onslaught of Motörhead, which is loud even in print. (May)

Reviewed on 04/28/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
Jane Austen at Home: A Biography

Lucy Worsley. St. Martin’s, $29.99 (352p) ISBN 978-1-250-13160-7

This enthusiastic, though often slow-going, biography by Worsley (The Art of the English Murder) delivers a portrait of the novelist in her successive homes, pondering the differences that place makes to Austen’s fiction. As a young girl in Steventon Rectory, for example, Austen became a consummate novel reader who dreamed of joining the cadre of popular female novelists of the time, such as Fanny Burney and Ann Radcliffe. In her years at Steventon, Austen wrote an early draft of the novel that later became Sense and Sensibility and she observed many of the details of domestic life that she would include in her novels. Living for a short time in straitened circumstances after her father’s death, Austen, according to Worsley, refused to sink into misery but instead turned her situation into art. When she moved into Chawton Cottage, Austen completed Mansfield Park, a novel that disparages the idea that an individual’s birthplace is more important than “life experience or talent.” In her final novel, Persuasion, Austen opens with the loss of a home and a period of rootlessness, and ends with the protagonist’s finding a permanent home, brings this thematic preoccupation of hers full circle. Worsley’s careful research delivers no dramatic new revelations about Austen’s life or writing, but Janeites will flock to the book nevertheless for its fresh perspective on their idol. (July)

Reviewed on 04/28/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
The Genius of Jane Austen: Her Love of Theatre and Why She Works in Hollywood

Paula Byrne. Harper Perennial, $16.99 trade paper (352p) ISBN 978-0-06-267449-4

Biographer Byrne (The Real Jane Austen) explores Austen’s relationship to the theater by placing her letters and novels within the context of popular Georgian-era dramas. While readers naturally associate Austen with the novel, Byrne argues that her use of devices such as comic misunderstandings and dramatic entrances and exits comes from theatrical tradition. Byrne provides a close reading of Austen’s various works, with a special emphasis on Mansfield Park’s play-related plotline. She draws comparisons between Austen’s novels and popular plays of her day, matching Sense and Sensibility’s satire to Richard Brinsley Sheridan’s The Rivals and noting settings and character types Mansfield Park shares with David Garrick’s The Clandestine Marriage. Byrne also explores adaptations of Austen’s works for stage and screen, notably A.A. Milne’s Miss Elizabeth Bennet and Amy Heckerling’s Clueless. At odds with scholarship that casts Austen as provincial and perhaps stodgy, Byrne presents an Austen immersed in her time’s popular entertainment, visiting Bath’s Theatre Royal and London’s Covent Garden, among others, and commenting astutely on performances in her correspondence, from which Byrne quotes liberally. While Byrne’s language skews academic, any Austen devotee should appreciate the thorough analysis of the novels and the crediting of previously overlooked influences. (July)

Reviewed on 04/28/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
The Exquisite Book of Paper Flower Transformations

Livia Cetti, photos by Kate Mathis. Abrams, $24.95 trade paper (176p) ISBN 978-1-4197-2412-1

Cetti, a floral stylist based in N.Y.C., highlights the hidden elements that make paper flowers and various arrangements of them a surprisingly realistic art form. All of the 25 creations included in the book celebrate the geometry of nature: Once you start to think of flowers as basic shapes, the author explains, one part becomes a block upon which the next part is built until the final creation ultimately comes together in a unified whole. In her arrangements, larger flowers provide the foundational element while the “holes” are filled in with medium-sized and smaller flowers (such as hellebores and coneflowers) for medium-size filler and poppies for the smaller spaces. This easily navigable book equips crafters with the skills for creating individual flowers and larger arrangements while providing a delightful overview on the basics of botany. Color photos. (Apr.)

Reviewed on 04/28/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
The Fine Art of Paper Flowers: A Guide to Making Beautiful and Lifelike Botanicals

Tiffanie Turner, photos by Tiffanie Turner and Aya Brackett. Watson-Guptill, $25 (264p) ISBN 978-0-399-57837-3

Artist and architect Turner dispels the misguided notion that crepe-paper flowers are for pep rallies and pom-poms in this illuminating DIY book. Combining the skills and aptitude befitting her dual careers, she offers a study in the use of delicate papers, precision tools, wire, hot glue, and various blending brushes to create botanical imitations that one is hard-pressed to distinguish from the real thing. The book is laid out in a series of tutorials that include templates for specific flower types, information about required tools, and step-by-step instructions. Specialty sections further elaborate various techniques on how to work with color and create additional elements such as leaves and buds. The author also includes an additional section about creating items for costuming and hairstyling. Under the mantra “You must make what you see, not what you think you see,” this book guides artisans to astonishing results. Color photos. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 04/28/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
The Boy Who Loved Too Much: A True Story of Pathological Friendliness

Jennifer Latson. Simon & Schuster, $26 (304p) ISBN 978-1-4767-7404-6

This terrific debut from Latson, a journalist, takes up the story of Eli and his mom, Gayle, when Eli is 12 years old. Any parent will recognize the factors in play: hormones, parental expectations for school, concerns about bullying, and so on. The multiplier effect for Gayle is her son’s genetic disorder, known as Williams syndrome. Since Williams amps up the oxytocin in Eli’s system, making him love everyone indiscriminately, Gayle has to teach her son skills that run counter to his nature—but that may keep him safe. Eli’s slowed development and stiff joints mean that complete independence from his mother at any future point is unlikely. Gayle, a single mom, confides, “I want him to live a long, happy life. I just want to be there for him.... If I could live just five minutes longer than he does, I’d be happy.” The author skillfully interweaves the science—what we do and don’t know about genetic disorders such as Williams—with a powerful story line. Eli and especially Gayle are beautifully drawn, and their struggles with an unknown future are both unique to their situation and universal to all parents. As the book’s perspective deliberately pans out to include teachers, counselors, family, friends, and, finally, Eli’s entire eighth-grade class, Latson delivers some unforgettable lessons about inclusion and parenthood. Agent: Brettne Bloom, Kneerim, Williams & Bloom. (June)

Reviewed on 04/28/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
Footnotes: How Running Makes Us Human

Vybarr Cregan-Reid. St. Martin’s/Dunne, $26.99 (352p) ISBN 978-1-250-12724-2

In this offbeat but entertaining take on the fitness memoir, Cregan-Reid (Discovering Gilgamesh) shares his discovery of and love of running, occasionally adding intimate details from his personal life and frequently from his runs. It’s a mashup that’s equal parts philosophy, neuroscience, history, and love note to the author’s exercise of choice. Cregan-Reid takes readers on a running tour, stopping off at Boston’s Spaulding National Running Center to see an Ironman Triathlete’s running injuries being diagnosed, sharing a memorable run through the South Harrow countryside, and finishing the London Marathon “almost by accident.” A self-described “challenged school student,” Cregan-Reid eventually went through a metamorphosis (largely unexplained here) that took him to graduate school; he discovered running while working on his doctoral thesis. Today the author is a professor and literary scholar. That explains why, in addition to finding information here about running retraining or selecting the right shoe, readers will also find liberal literary references to such writers as Austen, Chekhov, Coleridge, and Tolstoy. The book’s greatest strength, however, is in its explanation of running’s benefits (running makes “you smarter,” more attentive, and even makes you feel “more attractive,” according to the author) and in the author’s mystical, Anglicism-sprinkled descriptions of running. (July)

Reviewed on 04/28/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
Seven Steps to Managing Your Memory: What’s Normal, What’s Not, and What to Do About It

Andrew E. Budson and Maureen K. O’Connor. Oxford Univ., $27.95 (312p) ISBN 978-0-19-049495-7

Budson and O’Connor, a neurologist and neuropsychologist, respectively, present an informative and accessible discussion of memory loss, dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, and other mental-health concerns. Readers can flip straight to the sections relevant to them to access the science and medical information, or they can read fictionalized case studies. The book is divided into seven parts, one for each step in the authors’ program. In “Step One,” Budson and O’Connor investigate memory errors that can occur at any age and explain how memory changes with normal aging. “Step Four” digs into treatment and medications. In addition to brain science, the authors provide practical advice and strategies: for instance, brainteasers and crosswords may be enjoyable, the authors observe, but they won’t ward off memory loss; on the other hand, exercise, social interaction, and lifestyle changes (e.g., the Mediterranean diet) are proven ways brain health can be enhanced. This primer will be useful to middle-aged and elderly readers, caregivers, family members, healthcare professionals, and others striving to understand the aging brain or find concrete ways to enhance brain health. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 04/28/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
X
Stay ahead with
Tip Sheet!
Free newsletter: the hottest new books, features and more
X
X
X
Email Address

Password

Log In Lost Password

Parts of this site are only available to paying PW subscribers. Subscribers: to set up your digital access click here.

To subscribe, click here.

PW “All Access” site license members have access to PW’s subscriber-only website content. Simply close and relaunch your preferred browser to log-in. To find out more about PW’s site license subscription options please email: pw@pubservice.com.

If you have questions or need assistance setting up your account please email pw@pubservice.com or call 1-800-278-2991 (U.S.) or 1-818-487-2069 (all other countries), Monday-Friday between 5am and 5pm Pacific time for assistance.

Not Registered? Click here.