Subscriber-Only Content; You must be a PW subscriber to access the backissue database. PW has integrated its print and digital subscriptions, offering exciting new benefits to subscribers, who are now entitled to both the print edition and the digital edition via our app or online. For more information on PW's new integrated subscription plan, click here. If you are currently a PW subscriber, click "Login" for full access to the site (if you have not done so already, you will need to set up your account for the new system by going here), or click the "Subscribe" button to become a PW subscriber. Email service@publishersweekly.com with questions.

Login or Subscribe
On Becoming A Mother: Welcoming Your New Baby and Your New Life with Wisdom from Around the World

Edited by Brigid McConville. Oneworld (PGW, dist.), $16.99 (256p) ISBN 978-1-78074-389-9

“Traditions of celebrating pregnancy, supporting birth, welcoming and naming children are richly varied but universal,” writes McConville. This collection of international mothering rituals is a treasure chest of ideas on ceremonies, gifts, and practices to enrich the process of gestation, birthing, and mothering. Produced and inspired by members of the nonprofit White Ribbon Alliance that advocates for maternal health, the book combines narratives, quotes, photos, illustrations, and lists. It includes descriptions of useful but meaningful objects, such as a cradleboard, used by the Navajo to carry the baby, or the Japanese haraobi (belly sash) inscribed by a monk. In addition, the book touches on the roles and responsibilities of the father, from the care provided by Tanzania fathers to the close involvement of Quechuan (Andean) fathers during birth. Every mother and mother to be will be jealous of the Finnish Vauva Laatikko, the government’s gift to new mothers, which includes clothing, bedding, toys, and bath supplies —even condoms for the new parents. The American baby shower, Islamic naming ceremonies, and first birthdays in Korea sit comfortably next to each other in this global celebration of motherhood. Illus. Agent: Rebecca Winfield, David Luxton Associates. (May)

Reviewed on 04/18/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
A Survival Guide to Parenting Teens: Talking to Your Kids About Sexting, Drinking, Drugs, and Other Things That Freak You Out

Joani Geltman. Amacom, $16 trade paper (288p) ISBN 978-0-8144-3366-9

Like a good horror movie, this book begins with pedestrian problems: your teen won’t get up in the morning; your son won’t tell you what’s bothering him. By the time the author starts listing “icky” websites like Chatroulette and Ask.fm, where a teenager may be doing a striptease for a total stranger, the parenting horrors have begun. Though the book may freak some parents out, it helpfully prepares parents for situations that didn’t exist before smartphones and social networking. (The author even cautions against buying your teen a smartphone at all). Geltman encourages parents to over-supervise teens, whether it’s triple-guaranteeing that parents are home during every teen gathering, monitoring texts and computer activity, or keeping “a tally of all the money you give to your teen” as a way to teach money management. She peppers her text with real-life tragedies of parents who allowed their teen and his friends to drink at home, or a boy who forwarded his girlfriend’s naked photo to friends and was charged as a sex offender. In other words, she gives parents the ammunition, information, and permission to meet these parenting challenges with open eyes and firm resolve. Agent: Lauren Galit, LKG Agency. (May)

Reviewed on 04/18/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
8 Keys to End Bullying: Strategies for Parents & Schools

Signe Whitson. Norton, $19.95 trade paper (208p) ISBN 978-0-393-70928-5

Whitson (Friendship and Other Weapons) gives parents and educators an excellent set of tools to help young people deal with bullying, with “specific, clear, helpful guidelines… on how to intervene in effective ways.” Whitson begins by defining bullying as “intentionally aggressive behavior, repeated over time, that involves an imbalance of power,” carefully distinguishing it from behavior that is simply rude or mean. She distinguishes between varieties of bullying, from physical and verbal violence, relational abuse (like spreading rumors) and withdrawal of friendship to cyberbullying. While warning that there is no easy solution, she suggests “small, powerful acts” in an ongoing campaign to prevent bullying. Whitson goes beyond the expected with the rest of the seven keys, providing exercises, questions to consider, and practical strategies to help victims, bystanders, and even bullies. She devotes a chapter to changing the entire culture of a school via “social and emotional learning” because parents and teachers must be ready to provide powerful support. A necessary read for parents and teachers. (May)

Reviewed on 04/18/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
Commando Dad: A Basic Training Manual for the First Three Years of Fatherhood

Neil Sinclair. Chronicle, $16.95 trade paper (192p) ISBN 978-1-4521-2739-2

London-based father and former Royal Engineer Commando Sinclair found becoming a stay-at-home dad to be one of his most challenging assignments. His lighthearted manual advises on matters such as the use of pacifiers, how to change diapers, and what fathers should pack in their baby bag when taking Junior out of the house for an extended spell (“basic survival kit for long-term deployment”). Throughout, Sinclair emphasizes the importance of routines, and encourages fathers to ask for help. There is plenty of brass-tacks information here, such as a list of food that shouldn’t be introduced before the baby is six months old, and guidelines for a first-aid kit. However, the military lingo (home is “base camp,” the child is “baby trooper” or BT for short, the book is for dads who “are actively engaged in parenting maneuvers”) grows tiresome, and the myopic focus on dad-and-baby, to the almost wholesale omission of a coparent or marriage/domestic partnership, is odd. Still, this gift book would be a natural choice for co-ed baby showers. Illus. (June)

Reviewed on 04/18/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
The Baby Wait: Lessons Learned While Trying to Become a Mum

Lyn Sharkey. Orpen (Dufour, dist.), $25.95 trade paper (170p) ISBN 978-1-871305-95-1

In this practical and insightful guide, Sharkey, codirector of WLN Trading Ltd., which distributes the Maybe Baby Saliva Ovulation Test in Ireland and the U.K., who tried to get pregnant for nine years, explores the physical and emotional dimensions of infertility. Urging women to learn about their own fertility, Sharkey discusses charting, nutrition, and exercise. More significantly, the author considers the “emotional layer cake” of hopefulness and grief, and gives the reader permission to feel frustrated with pregnant friends. Sharkey shares some details of her story, recounting, for example, the afternoon when, at lunch with a mother of three, she felt the sudden devastation of a late period coming. Indeed, even more autobiographical vignettes would have been welcome. Sharkey’s voice is astute, and appropriately funny: speaking of why she hates the term “missed miscarriage,” she explains that it “sounds like it has slipped your mind that you were supposed to miscarry.” Readers may wish to hand out copies of the very useful concluding chapter on how to help a friend who struggles with infertility. This book is a welcome addition to the pregnancy and parenting shelves. (June)

Reviewed on 04/18/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
This Is Ridiculous This Is Amazing: Parenthood in 71 Lists

Jason Good. Chronicle, $14.95 (176p) ISBN 978-1-4521-2921-1

Stand-up comedian and blogger Good, father of two young sons, finds that being a dad is perfect fodder for jokes and comedic introspection. Here, he presents 71 humor-filled lists, with topics ranging from “How to Defend Yourself Against a Toddler Attack” and “Games You Can Play While Lying Down” to “Love Hurts: Especially My Shoulder.” Good offers advice that parents are unlikely to hear elsewhere, such as suggestions that couples sleep in separate beds and schedule intercourse for once a week so that one parent feels like they are “doing it in a hotel” when that night rolls around. He proposes inventive uses for baby wipes (cleaning mulch off a hotdog, crushing bugs) alongside tips on how to eat cookies while wearing a ski mask. In addition to child-centered lists, Good includes a sweet ode to his wife that applauds her patience and confidence, in spite of the fact that she enjoys eating goat cheese that smells like “the foot of a medieval peasant.” Parents will appreciate Good’s offbeat outlook and quirky one-liners. (June)

Reviewed on 04/18/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
Gale Gand’s Lunch!

Gale Gand, with Christie Matheson. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $27.99 (256p) ISBN 978-0-544-22650-0

Lunch is an often-underrated meal, but in her newest book acclaimed Chicago chef and TV personality Gand gives it her full attention. Gand, writing with Matheson, starts out with simple, nutritious snacks like baked kale chips; crispy roasted chickpeas; and homemade banana chips. Gand’s “Sammies” include recipes for the a turkey reuben; Cuban sandwich; and lobster roll. Comfort food favorites like potato leek soup and chicken and dumpling dominate the Soup chapter, while internationally inspired dishes rule the section on appetizers like Thai summer rolls and grilled tuna with cucumber wasabi salsa. Gand’s main course salad options include the undeniably appealing slow-roasted salmon Niçoise salad. Also covered are vegetable salads and sides, fruits, desserts, and drinks. Gand delivers a solid collection of popular, if typical, lunchtime dishes with something for everyone. Agent: Jane Dystel, Dystel & Goderich Literary. (Apr.)

Reviewed on 04/18/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
America’s Most Wanted Recipes at the Grill

Ron Douglas. Atria, $16 trade paper (356p) ISBN 978-1-4767-3489-7

The latest in Douglas’s bestselling series of reverse engineering popular dishes at chain restaurants (America’s Most Wanted Recipes, etc) is dedicated to grill-centered fare, enabling followers to whip up pitch-perfect versions of In-N-Out Burger’s iconic Double Double or A&W’s Deluxe Grilled Chicken Sandwich in their own backyards. Organized alphabetically by restaurant, fans can simply flip to their restaurant of choice to view Douglas’s take on a handful of the chains’ signature dishes. In some cases, such as Red Lobster’s grilled rack of shrimp, the instructions are painfully simple (skewer shrimp, brush with olive oil, grill), while in others, such as Chili’s Southwestern Egg Rolls and, somewhat surprisingly, Qdoba’s three-cheese burrito, they’ll need to source a seemingly endless number of ingredients and go through multiple steps in order to achieve that unique flavor. Once readers realize how much effort it does or doesn’t take to recreate their favorite item and ask themselves questions like, “Do you really need to make your own onion rings from scratch for an DIY Angry Whopper?” they may come to the conclusion that it’s simply easier to hop in the car and go to the source. Just because you can doesn’t always mean you should. But for those who dare, this will likely strike a chord. (May)

Reviewed on 04/18/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
Taming The Feast: Ben Ford’s Field Guide to Adventurous Cooking

Ben Ford and Carolyn Carreno. Atria, $34.99 (274p) ISBN 978-1-4767-0639-9

Those with an appreciation for large get-togethers will have a field day with Ben Ford’s guide to toothsome feasts in this impressive and occasionally daunting collection of epic dinners centered around a main (often meaty) dish that range from the expected (a whole roasted pig that’ll feed 70–80) to the inspired, such as an epic Wood-Fired Paella served with an assortment of shellfish, chorizo, pork confit, and rabbit meatballs. Many of the chef’s meals (Ford is the owner and executive chef of Ford’s Filling Station in Culver City, Calif.), such as sturgeon grilled on a cedar plank, a fish fry, or grilled burgers and brats, start out simply enough, but are blown up to block-party proportions in this inspired presentation. His fish fry, for example, calls for a cast-iron cauldron capable of containing 10 gallons of oil, and a clambake requires a fire permit in addition to a 59-gallon oak barrel (instructions for building your own are provided). But once readers have sourced the required materials, they’re off to the races, as Ford’s practical step-by-step instructions and timelines are clear and to the point. Even if readers never attempt a meal at Ford’s level, they’ll likely find that a couple of his dishes, like his Cheddar Cheese Loaf with Artisanal Ham or simple Charred Leeks, deserve a turn. Agent: Janis Donnoud, Jans A. Donnaud & Assoc. (May)

Reviewed on 04/18/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
Thailand: The Cookbook

Jean-Pierre Gabriel. Phaidon, $49.95 (528p) ISBN 978-0-7148-6529-4

Thailand has long been admired for its scenic landscape and flavorful cuisine, both of which are brilliantly showcased in this beautiful collection. Photographer Gabriel takes the reader on a journey to this rich and diverse country, sharing insights into regional differences, the secrets of the Thai kitchen, such as integrating the four tastes of salt, sweet, sour, and spicy, and traditional cooking tools. He includes 500 authentic recipes that will appeal to disparate palates. While roasted crickets and red ants might appeal to few Americans, glass noodle salad and spicy shrimp soup will please the masses. Gabriel also includes curries, stir fries, and desserts as well as soups, salads, and sauces. Rice and noodle recipes excel, from Thai pork fried rice with fried eggs to crispy rice noodles with herbs. Grilled, boiled, and fried dishes highlight proteins in flavorful combinations, such as grilled tilapia with spicy dips, crisp chicken and lemongrass, and steamed egg with shrimp and coconut milk. Gabriel’s luscious photos capture the beauty of Thailand’s people, food, and landscape and rounds out this stellar compilation. Armchair travelers and cooks at all levels will welcome this remarkable book. (May)

Reviewed on 04/18/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
X
Stay ahead with
Tip Sheet!
Free newsletter: the hottest new books, features and more
X
Only $18.95/month for Digital Access
or $20.95 for Print+Digital Access!
X
Only $18.95/month for Digital Access
or $20.95 for Print+Digital Access!
X
Email Address

Password

Log In Lost Password

PW has integrated its print and digital subscriptions, offering exciting new benefits to subscribers, who are now entitled to both the print edition and the digital editions of PW (online or via our app). For instructions on how to set up your accout for digital access, click here. For more information, click here.

The part of the site you are trying to access is now available to subscribers only. Subscribers: to set up your digital subscription with the new system (if you have not done so already), click here. To subscribe, click here.

Email pw@pubservice.com with questions.

Not Registered? Click here.