Subscriber-Only Content; You must be a PW subscriber to access the Table-of-Contents Database.

Subscribers can click the "login" button below to access the Table-of-Contents Database. (If you have not done so already, you will need to set up your digital access by going here.)

Or for immediate access you can click the "subscribe" link below.

PW “All Access” site license members have access to PW’s subscriber-only website content. Simply close and relaunch your preferred browser to log-in. To find out more about PW’s site license subscription options please email: pw@pubservice.com.

If you have questions or need assistance setting up your account please email pw@pubservice.com or call 1-800-278-2991 (U.S.) or 1-818-487-2069 (all other countries) , Monday-Friday between 5am and 5pm Pacific time for assistance.

For any other questions about PublshersWeekly.com, email service@publishersweekly.com.

Login or

Hollywood Homicide: A Detective by Day Mystery

Kellye Garrett. Midnight Ink, $14.99 trade paper (312p) ISBN 978-0-7387-5261-7

Hard-up, semiretired actress Dayna “Day” Anderson, the appealing narrator of Garrett’s winning first novel and series launch, runs out of gas one day at a stoplight on an L.A. street. While pondering what to do next, she notices a billboard offering a $15,000 reward for information on the hit-and-run murder of aspiring actress Haley Joseph. Day, who realizes she passed by the scene of Haley’s death some weeks earlier, decides it’s time to turn private eye in an effort to work her way out of debt and save her parents’ house from foreclosure. She wrangles assistance from her two best friends—flashy Sienna, a reality star in training, and no-nonsense Emme, the identical twin sister of Hollywood’s biggest star. In the course of her investigation, Day comes to care more about catching the killer than earning the reward. A former magazine editor who’s contributed to TV’s Cold Case, Garrett writes with humor and insight about the Hollywood scene. Readers will look forward to Day’s further adventures. Agent: Michelle Richter, Fuse Literary. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 06/23/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
Crossing the Lines

Sulari Gentill. Poisoned Pen, $26.95 (276p) ISBN 978-1-4642-0916-1

Fans of postmodern fiction will enjoy this departure from Gentill’s 1930s series (Miles Off Course, etc.). It’s an exploration, as one character puts it, of “an author’s relationship with her protagonist, an examination of the tenuous line between belief and reality, imagination and self, and what happens when that line is crossed.” Madeleine d’Leon, a former corporate lawyer who writes about a crime-solving housemaid, decides to try her hand at something different—a standalone crime novel featuring author Edward McGinnity, who writes “the kind of worthy incomprehensible stuff that wins awards.” In Maddie’s telling, Edward becomes a suspect in the murder of an obnoxious editor, who was found with a broken neck at the base of the fire stairs of a gallery exhibiting paintings by Edward’s married love interest. Gradually, Maddie and Edward become aware of each other and grow close emotionally. Those who favor conventional mysteries should be prepared for an ambiguous payoff. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 06/23/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
Shadow Girl: An Afton Tangler Thriller

Gerry Schmitt. Berkley, $26 (320p) ISBN 978-0-425-28178-9

At the start of Schmitt’s uneven second thriller featuring family liaison officer and single mom Afton Tangler (after 2016’s Little Girl Gone), a surface-to-air missile destroys a helicopter bringing a heart for transplant to the University of Minnesota Hospital. The authorities initially believe the strike was the work of terrorists, but the reader knows from the start that the killers were indirectly targeting against the heart’s intended recipient, Leland Odin, the owner of the Diamond Shopping Network. Who knew that the heart in the helicopter was destined for Odin? Afton and Det. Max Montgomery, of the Minneapolis PD, question the millionaire’s strangely distant wife and his bored teenage stepdaughter, along with Odin’s business partner and other associates, none of whom seems overly concerned about Odin’s health. Schmitt keeps the plot moving at a good clip, but Afton’s readiness to carry a gun and race into danger is at odds with her personal and professional obligations and is likely to leave the reader confused as to what her role is supposed to be. Agent: Sam Pinkus, Keystone Literary. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 06/23/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
On Her Majesty’s Frightfully Secret Service

Rhys Bowen. Berkley Prime Crime, $26 (304p) ISBN 978-0-425-28350-9

Agatha Award–winner Bowen’s amusing 11th Royal Spyness mystery (after 2016’s Crowned and Dangerous) takes Lady Georgiana “Georgie” Rannoch, 35th in line to the British throne, to Italy in the spring of 1935. She joins a house party hosted at a lavish estate near Stresa on Lake Maggiore, where her mission, on behalf of Queen Mary, is to keep an eye on that woman (aka Wallis Simpson), the paramour of the Prince of Wales. Meanwhile, a high-level conference among representatives of England, France, and Italy to discuss the Nazi threat is taking place at Stresa. A murder doesn’t occur until late in the action, but series fans know not to expect thrills and chills. The story’s main pleasure lies in the picture of Georgie’s world, where she takes tea with Queen Mary at Buckingham Palace and records Mrs. Simpson’s imperious behavior. Another delight is the large cast, which includes horrible countesses, terrifyingly efficient lady’s maids, grim-faced nuns, and Nazis, both brash and bashful. Fans of light mysteries will be rewarded. Agent: Meg Ruley, Jane Rotrosen Agency. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 06/23/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
A Deadly Betrothal: An Elizabethan Mystery

Fiona Buckley. Crème de la Crime, $28.99 (224p) ISBN 978-1-78029-097-3

Ursula Blanchard, the secret half-sister of Elizabeth I, struggles to deal with darkening conspiracies both at home and at Hampton Court, in Buckley’s dramatic 15th Tudor mystery (after 2016’s Heretic’s Creed). In her last outing, Ursula faced danger in an eerie, snowbound religious house whose female residents possessed deadly secrets. This story may lack its predecessor’s chilling atmosphere, but the narrative’s focus on Elizabethan politics delivers a jolt of excitement in its depiction of the key players in the 1570s court. Buckley paints a sympathetic portrait of Elizabeth, a queen in her mid-40s, pressured to marry a much younger man for the sake of the country and consumed by terror at the prospect of sex and pregnancy. As for the mystery, when a teenage son of a friend disappears and is found murdered, Ursula’s probing begins, with the death of a nobleman raising the stakes. The action builds to a satisfying conclusion. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 06/23/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
The Color of Fear

Marcia Muller. Grand Central, $26 (304p) ISBN 978-1-4555-3892-8

The savage beating of Sharon McCone’s 82-year-old father by a gang of thugs kicks off MWA Grand Master Muller’s outstanding 34th mystery featuring the San Francisco PI (after 2016’s Someone Always Knows). McCone’s father, nationally known Native American painter Elwood Farmer, arrived in San Francisco from Montana two days earlier for the Christmas holidays. He was shopping for gifts in the city’s Marina district when he was assaulted in what may have been a racially motivated attack. SFPD Sgt. Priscilla Anders, however, suspects the beating may be tied to Farmer’s relationship to McCone, and that theory seems more and more plausible after a break-in at McCone’s office and vandalism directed at her employees. The stakes rise when McCone becomes the target of cyberattacks and death threats. She pursues a number of leads, many of which fail to pan out and others that are frustratingly vague, but she eventually discovers that a hate group may be involved after all. At the exciting climax, McCone valiantly arms herself and goes into action alone. Agent: Molly Friedrich, Friedrich Literary. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 06/23/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
The Sorbonne Affair: A Hugo Marston Novel

Mark Pryor. Seventh Street, $15.95 trade paper (270p) ISBN 978-1-63388-261-4

Pryor’s entertaining seventh Hugo Marston novel finds the cultured head of security at the American embassy in Paris and former FBI profiler attending the funeral of actress Isabel Severin, a key player in 2016’s The Paris Librarian. After the service, Hugo is approached by bestselling American romance author Helen Hancock, who informs him that she suspects she’s being stalked. He’s not inclined to take her claim seriously—until Helen finds a spy cam in her hotel room. When hotel employee Andrew Baxter is stabbed to death in a stairwell in the hotel, the case takes an ominous turn, especially after Hugo discovers that it was Andrew who planted the camera in Helen’s room. The mystery deepens when one of Helen’s writing students is murdered and Hugo is attacked outside his own apartment. A fascinating cast, an intriguing subplot that delves into Hugo’s past, and a gorgeous Parisian setting add to the story’s appeal. Agent: Ann Collette, Rees Literary Agency. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 06/23/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
The Walls

Hollie Overton. Redhook, $25 (416p) ISBN 978-0-316-26876-9

In this pulse-pounding thriller from Overton (Baby Doll), 32-year-old single mother Kristy Tucker falls for her teenage son’s judo instructor, Lance Dobson. At first, long, depressing days spent working as a public information officer for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice leave Kristy eager for laughter-filled evenings with Lance. Then the couple marry, and Lance begins to physically and emotionally abuse Kristy. She tries to leave, but he threatens to kill her son and ailing father. Part of Kristy’s job involves interviewing prisoners. When death-row inmate Clifton Harris asks about a bruise on Kristy’s face, she breaks down and tells him everything. She balks at Clifton’s suggestion that someone in prison might be able to help, but eventually concedes that killing Lance is her only option. After a languidly paced setup, the book’s tension and drama increase exponentially, and readers become as invested in the wrongfully convicted Clifton’s freedom as they are in Kristy’s. Many will applaud Overton’s implicit criticism of capital punishment and laissez-faire attitudes toward domestic violence. Agent: Eve Attermann, William Morris Endeavor. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 06/23/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
Sulfur Springs

William Kent Krueger. Atria, $26 (320p) ISBN 978-1-5011-4734-0

Former sheriff Cork O’Connor, Edgar-winner Krueger’s tragedy-plagued hero, faces further heartache in his moving and suspenseful 16th outing (after 2016’s Manitou Canyon). Cork, who lost his father and his first wife to violence, is in bed with his second wife, Rainy Bisonette, a Native American healer, one night in Aurora, Minn., when Rainy retrieves a disturbing voicemail from her son Peter, who’s been living in Arizona. Peter has turned his troubled life around, kicking his drug habit and using the lessons he learned to become a substance abuse counselor. His garbled message, however, seems to indicate that he has killed someone named Rodriguez. Cork and Rainy race to Arizona, where they’re stunned to learn that Peter left his job more than a year earlier. As they search for Peter, Cork becomes increasingly uneasy about his growing sense that Rainy is hiding something significant from him. As usual, Krueger does a fine job combining distinctive characters with a satisfying plot. Agent: Danielle Egan-Miller, Browne & Miller Literary Associates. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 06/23/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
City of Saviors

Rachel Howzell Hall. Forge, $26.99 (304p) ISBN 978-0-7653-8119-4

Hall’s absorbing fourth mystery featuring LAPD homicide cop Elouise “Lou” Norton (after 2016’s Trail of Echoes) finds Lou, recently promoted to detective sergeant, still suffering from injuries sustained in her previous outing and struggling with symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, to which she refuses to admit. One hot Los Angeles summer day, Lou and her partner, Colin Taggert, are called to the debris-filled home of 73-year-old Eugene Washington, who was found dead that morning sitting in his armchair. A gun rests on the floor near the body. While others at the scene want to write off the cause of death as a combination of heat stroke and food poisoning, Lou thinks otherwise. Her inquiries bring her into contact with an array of intriguing, well-defined characters. The dialogue has moments of genuine wit, and Lou’s relationships with her women friends ring true. Her struggle with her inner demons adds fascinating nuances to how she behaves on the job and in her personal life. Agent: Jill Marsal, Marsal Lyon Literary Agency. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 06/23/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
X
Stay ahead with
Tip Sheet!
Free newsletter: the hottest new books, features and more
X
X
X
Email Address

Password

Log In Lost Password

Parts of this site are only available to paying PW subscribers. Subscribers: to set up your digital access click here.

To subscribe, click here.

PW “All Access” site license members have access to PW’s subscriber-only website content. Simply close and relaunch your preferred browser to log-in. To find out more about PW’s site license subscription options please email: pw@pubservice.com.

If you have questions or need assistance setting up your account please email pw@pubservice.com or call 1-800-278-2991 (U.S.) or 1-818-487-2069 (all other countries), Monday-Friday between 5am and 5pm Pacific time for assistance.

Not Registered? Click here.