Subscriber-Only Content; You must be a PW subscriber to access the Table-of-Contents Database.

Subscribers can click the "login" button below to access the Table-of-Contents Database. (If you have not done so already, you will need to set up your digital access by going here.)

Or for immediate access you can click the "subscribe" link below.

PW “All Access” site license members have access to PW’s subscriber-only website content. Simply close and relaunch your preferred browser to log-in. To find out more about PW’s site license subscription options please email: pw@pubservice.com.

If you have questions or need assistance setting up your account please email pw@pubservice.com or call 1-800-278-2991 (U.S.) or 1-818-487-2069 (all other countries) , Monday-Friday between 5am and 5pm Pacific time for assistance.

For any other questions about PublshersWeekly.com, email service@publishersweekly.com.

Login or

Feeding the Flock: The Foundations of Mormon Thought; Church and Praxis

Terryl L. Givens. Oxford Univ., $34.95 (424p) ISBN 978-0-19-979493-5

Givens (When Souls Had Wings), author of numerous books on Mormon history and theology, has completed an excellent duology with this companion volume to Wrestling the Angel. Here, Givens moves away from the philosophical background and religious tenets of Mormonism to discuss the day-to-day practice of Mormon believers. He divides his text in three: the structure of the church itself as a working hierarchy, and then the salvific and non-salvific ordinances offered by the church. Those looking for the historical or scriptural foundations of modern-day Mormon positions on issues such as sexual orientation or gender expression will be disappointed; Givens gives the role of women in the church, for example, no more than a cursory mention. Issues of sexual identity receive even less attention. As in his previous volume, Givens comes to no conclusions at either chapter or volume level, choosing instead to stop where the discussion of his final element stops; the academic reader, particularly, may find this an unusual gap, and both books would have benefited from some sort of closing overview. Givens does, however, provide rich notes that should serve the interested reader well in locating additional reading. (July)

Reviewed on 05/19/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
The Currency of Love

Jill Dodd. Atria, $26 (302p) ISBN 978-1-5011-5037-1

This page-turning memoir of decadence and faith will resonate with seekers everywhere. While working as a struggling young model in Paris, Dodd met Adnan Khashoggi, a Saudi Arabian businessman who had amassed a fortune. Caught up in a world of private jets, diamonds, and cocaine, she became one of Khashoggi’s “pleasure wives,” only to later learn that she’d been part of a carefully plotted scheme for a negotiated price: Dodd had been picked out of a notebook. Her walk through—and eventually away from—the dizzying world of extreme wealth and glamour includes her spiritual journey, which progresses as she learns more of her situation and eventually turns away from the lifestyle she has been forced into. Originally from Downey, Calif., Dodd was raised without religion, but she prayed to God as she navigated the instability of a modeling career and her life in a harem. As her search for faith intensified, she immersed herself in the world of psychics, hypnotherapists, and holy men until she realized it brought confusion, not peace. Scattered throughout the book are touching moments where she recalls being overcome with a sense of the divine providence of God; that guidance helps her find her way, even as questions linger. “I will never understand God,” Dodd concludes, “but will keep praying and meditating.” (June)

Reviewed on 05/19/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
A Fierce Love: One Woman’s Courageous Journey to Save Her Marriage

Shauna Shanks. Zondervan, $16.99 trade paper (240p) ISBN 978-0-310-34753-8

Shanks, owner of health food café Smallfolk in Dallas, Tex., courageously tells the story of how her 10-year marriage unraveled before coming back together in the end. Shanks, a Christian who admits to drifting away from her faith, draws parallels between her journey to reinvigorated faith and the death and rebirth of her marriage. She recounts the seemingly endless days and sleepless nights that followed her husband telling her that their marriage was a mistake and he wanted out. When Shanks found and read her husband’s diary, she felt a sliver of hope, as the words indubitably showed a passionate love for her. Afraid her husband would be upset that she read the diary without his permission, Shanks was relieved that her admission and apology opened up new avenues of communication. She reveals that 1 Corinthians 13 formed the basis for her “Love Filter,” a mental reminder not to react emotionally to her husband’s occasional fits of anger, but to speak with calm, deliberate purpose as she fought for their marriage. Shanks offers readers practical recommendations and loads of adapted biblical teachings for overcoming one’s evil impulses with good intentions. Shanks’s story will bring hope to readers in the darkest times of married life, pointing directly to God’s redemptive plan for remaking what has been broken. (June)

Reviewed on 05/19/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
Heaven Is for Healing: A Soul’s Journey After Suicide

Joe Gallenberger. Rainbow Ridge, $16.95 trade paper (304p) ISBN 978-1-937907-51-8

This heartfelt work, a mishmash of memoir, self-help, and channeled knowledge, will appeal to readers coping with the loss of a loved one who wish to explore the unknown of life after death. Psychotherapist Gallenberger wrote a memoir, Brothers Forever, exploring his grief over the suicide of his brother, Pete, and subsequent understanding that death on this plane of existence does not end consciousness on the next. Here Gallenberger shares his further experiences and realizations with others who have suffered the loss of a loved one through suicide. His desire to contact his brother leads Gallenberger to channeler Pam Hogan, who conducts a series of encounters with Pete that reveal truths about the next life as well as Pete’s feelings and thoughts about unresolved earthly events. Gallenberger asserts that channeling can bring comfort to those left behind and provide valuable tools for those dealing with loss. Between musings about channeling and extrapolations about the survival of consciousness after death, Gallenberger also provides a wealth of advice about money, diet, life goals, and the importance of overcoming fear. (Mar.)

Reviewed on 05/19/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
Better Now: Six Big Ideas to Improve Health Care for all Canadians

Danielle Martin. Allen Lane Canada, $32 (304p) ISBN 978-0-7352-3259-4

Martin, a doctor who teaches family medicine and health care policy at the University of Toronto, thinks big in this smart and highly readable prescription for a better Canadian health care system. Stretching from health care policy to broader social policy, these are her six ideas: focus on effective relationship-based care; include prescription medication as part of standard health coverage; reduce unnecessary exams and interventions; reorganize health care to do more with less; implement a basic income guarantee; and advance regional and provincial successes to be pan-Canadian. Readers need not fear a tough, dry read of jargon and policy; Martin is a good writer who discusses the six ideas in interesting and careful detail. The first chapter includes a fascinating account of her experience explaining the Canadian system to a U.S. Senate subcommittee on health care in 2014 at the invitation of Sen. Bernie Sanders. She writes stirring narratives about her own patients (protecting their privacy with aliases) and her firsthand observations of the health care system. This is a recommended read for health care providers and the public in Canada and beyond. (Jan.)

Reviewed on 05/19/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
Reinventing Prosperity: Managing Economic Growth to Reduce Unemployment, Inequality, and Climate Change

Graeme Maxton and Jorgen Randers. Greystone (Perseus, U.S. dist.; UTP, Canadian dist.), $24.95 (256p) ISBN 978-1-77164-251-4

In this well-argued book, Maxton (The End of Progress) secretary general of the international think tank Club of Rome, and Randers (Limits to Growth), a professor of climate strategy at the Norwegian Business School, tackle the one misconception they say most stands in the way of global action on climate change: the belief that economic growth is essential. The authors contend that the current economic order, which depends on ever-increasing growth, has exacerbated the disparities between the rich and poor and displaced workers in vulnerable industries. Aging populations, resource depletion, and climate change will further reduce standards of living and quality of life. Maxton and Randers argue that it is possible to “create jobs, boost average living standards, reduce inequalities—even without any economic growth at all” and still manage climate change. They outline 13 propositions, explaining complex issues in a style that is clear, logical, and succinct. They acknowledge that this unconventional and controversial approach will require significant government intervention, a shift in the way most people see the world, and the poor wresting control of democratic governance from the rich to change the current economic order. These seemingly insurmountable challenges limit the book’s usefulness as an action plan. (Sept.)

Reviewed on 05/19/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
Mars: Our Future on the Red Planet

Leonard David. National Geographic, $30 (288p) ISBN 978-1-4262-1758-6

Space journalist David (coauthor, with Buzz Aldrin, of Mission to Mars) unveils what is ostensibly a plan for human interplanetary travel, lavishly illustrated with scenes of Mars and photos from the space program. The chapters cover the technical difficulties in launching a worthy ship, the challenges to surviving on Mars, and the psychological effects of living in close quarters with only a few others. There is much good information to be found, but the work is marred by a confusing layout. Insets and sidebars often accompany unrelated text. For instance, an inset regarding the possibility of being thrown off course is laid out alongside a study on finding water. That said, readers will be intrigued by the chapters on microbial dangers and options for establishing a long-term colony. However, convoluted technical writing can make sections difficult for a non-specialist to follow. David attempts a lighthearted tone in places, but his word choices can be underwhelming, if not glib. Better text editing and layout would improve the book’s overall clarity. It’s a shame that the abundance of valuable information in this book is so difficult to extract, but the quality of the photos and illustrations might make it worth getting anyway. Illus. (Nov.)

Reviewed on 05/19/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
Able Archer 83: The Secret History of the NATO Exercise That Almost Triggered Nuclear War

Edited by Nate Jones. New Press, $27.95 (368p) ISBN 978-1-62097-261-8

Jones, director of the Freedom of Information Act Project for the National Security Archive, adopts an academic approach in recounting the unnerving story of how a routine 1983 NATO exercise convinced some Soviet leaders that war was imminent. The Cold War’s delicate nuclear standoff seemed in peril after President Reagan took office in 1981. Reagan’s pugnacious rhetoric and military buildup placed the U.S.S.R. in a “hyper-defensive” state. The Soviets reacted badly when NATO launched Able Archer 83, a training exercise that included such elements as long radio silences, cryptic announcements, loading of warheads, and a countdown through all DEFCON phases. Soviet leaders worried that this was a deceptive prelude to war; their forces went on alert, preparing to respond and maybe preempt a strike. Nothing happened, mostly thanks to a few individuals on both sides who kept their fingers off the trigger. Jones delivers a solid, if relatively brief, summary of events before presenting more than 200 pages of facsimiles of original documents that give diligent readers an impression of how contemporaries reacted to the situation. The primary sources make for predictably turgid reading, but this is still an unsettling reminder of how a simple misstep can negate all safeguards against nuclear war. (Nov.)

Reviewed on 05/19/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
Recaptured Africans: Surviving Slave Ships, Detention, and Dislocation in the Final Years of the Slave Trade

Sharla M. Fett. Univ. of North Carolina, $39.95 (320p) ISBN 978-1-4696-3002-1

In this brief but illuminating book, Fett, professor of history at Occidental College, focuses on the experiences of roughly 1,800 “recaptured Africans” whom the U.S. Navy seized from four ships bound for Cuba. They were among the million-plus African captives who were illegally taken aboard American vessels between 1807 and the outbreak of the Civil War. These captives were brought temporarily to Charleston, S.C., and then to Key West, Fla., before being returned to the free black nation of Liberia in 1860. Fett vividly depicts the involuntary American sojourn of these men, women, and children; she argues that their experience, and the public responses they engendered, “provides an instructive example of early U.S. imperialism.” Fett’s study presents a revealing view of the debates over slavery, race, and empire in the years immediately preceding a war to which these issues were central. It also sheds light on the previously little-studied category of the “recaptive,” a historical figure that, Fett contends, further complicates the history of slavery in the antebellum U.S. and locates it in a wider Atlantic world of trade and diplomacy. Fett emphasizes the suffering and resilience of the recaptives, restoring agency to people whose experiences are too often seen as abstractions. (Jan.)

Reviewed on 05/19/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
Finks: How the CIA Tricked the World’s Best Writers

Joel Whitney. O/R Books, $25 trade paper (328p) ISBN 978-1-68219-024-1

In this study on the Cold War’s cultural front, Guernica cofounder Whitney examines how the CIA influenced, manipulated, and funded innumerable magazines and journals in an ongoing affair of propaganda and subversion. Starting in 1950 under the guise of the Congress for Cultural Freedom, the CIA enlisted writers, editors, and many more to not-so-subtly sway public opinion across the globe against Communism, with publications such as the Paris Review, Encounter, Der Monat, and Preuves carrying out the mission. Whitney examines how all of these magazines and literary luminaries played their roles throughout the 1950s and 1960s. “What follows is by necessity a group biography, reconstructed from the splintered histories of the time,” Whitney writes, that “have been scattered around the world in books, archives, and websites.” Whitney concludes that while the people involved may have meant well, in turning these magazines into a weapon, they undermined and corrupted “our practice of cultural and press freedom.” The book’s subject matter is fascinating and complex, but Whitney’s writing is dry and unengaging; what might work for a lecture comes across as dispassionate, even dull, in print. Teasing apart the myriad lists of magazines and personalities grows tedious after a while, but for those willing to slog through, a rich tapestry of material awaits. (Jan.)

Reviewed on 05/19/2017 | Details & Permalink

show more
X
Stay ahead with
Tip Sheet!
Free newsletter: the hottest new books, features and more
X
X
X
Email Address

Password

Log In Lost Password

Parts of this site are only available to paying PW subscribers. Subscribers: to set up your digital access click here.

To subscribe, click here.

PW “All Access” site license members have access to PW’s subscriber-only website content. Simply close and relaunch your preferred browser to log-in. To find out more about PW’s site license subscription options please email: pw@pubservice.com.

If you have questions or need assistance setting up your account please email pw@pubservice.com or call 1-800-278-2991 (U.S.) or 1-818-487-2069 (all other countries), Monday-Friday between 5am and 5pm Pacific time for assistance.

Not Registered? Click here.